How Much Does A Mattress Cost

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How Much Does a Mattress Cost?

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How Much Does a Mattress Cost?

There’s no one-size-fits-all price tag for a quality mattress. You can spend as little as $250 and as much as $3,500+ on a new bed. Many factors contribute to a bed’s price: the mattress size, materials used, country of manufacture, and more.

Because there is so much variance in price from size to size and material to material, it can be difficult to get a basic grasp of a price range to expect. For a quick estimate, it’s helpful to compare price ranges for each category of mattress.

Average Mattress Cost by Category:

Mattress CategoryDescriptionPrice RangeAverage Price (Queen)Average Price (Twin)
BudgetAffordable beds, typically all-foam or innerspring construction using basic materials.$250-$1,000$600$400
Mid-RangeMid-range beds, usually all-foam, innerspring, or hybrid using quality materials.$500-$1,500$1,000$600
LuxuryLuxurious beds; mostly hybrid and latex construction using high-end materials.$1,200-$3,000+$1,800$1,300

Average Mattress Cost by Material:

Mattress CategoryDescriptionPrice RangeAverage Price (Queen)Average Price (Twin)
InnerspringAffordable beds, typically all-foam or innerspring construction using basic materials.$500-$1,200+$1,050$600
All-FoamMid-range beds, usually all-foam, innerspring, or hybrid using quality materials.$250-$1,200+$1,050$500
LatexLuxurious beds; mostly hybrid and latex construction using high-end materials.$1,000-$2,500+$2,000$1,100
HybridHybrid beds combine traditional metal coils with layers of foam materials, to create a good blend of comfort and support.$1,000-$3,000+$2,050$1,150

Factors Influencing Mattress Price

A wide variety of factors can contribute to the overall cost of a new bed. The most significant ones are:

Material & Construction:Perhaps the biggest cost factor for a new bed are the materials used, and the quality and craftsmanship that goes into making the mattress. Hybrid beds (which have both innerspring coils and foam) are typically more expensive than all-foam models. And beds made from luxury or specialty materials, such as latex, are also pricier than standard memory foam. Even all-foam beds can have a significant amount of variance in price, depending on the type of foam used. Polyfoam is relatively inexpensive, while memory foam and specialty materials such as copper-infused memory foam can add to the cost of a bed.

Mattress Size:The price of a mattress will scale directly with the size. Smaller beds, such as Twins, generally cost about half as much as large King size beds. Less popular bed sizes, including California King and Twin XL are also slightly more expensive than similarly sized mattresses in more traditional sizes. Refer to the table above to get an idea of mattress prices by size.

Online vs. In-Person:While it may seem logical to purchase a mattress in a brick-and-mortar store where you can test it out, it will almost always be more expensive to go this route. A Consumer Reports investigation found that local mattress stores were selling mattresses at markups of up to 900% – which means customers were paying $3,000 for a mattress that cost about $300 to make. Online mattress retailers have far lower overhead costs, and are able to sell at much smaller margins. By shopping for a mattress online, you can save a good amount of money.

Warranty & Return Terms:Most new beds come with some sort of warranty, and most manufacturers also offer some sort of return policy. The details of these policies can influence the initial purchase cost, with longer warranties typically adding some cost to your initial purchase price.

Additional Costs for a New Mattress

The initial purchase price of a mattress is the biggest expense, but it’s not the only one. There are some extra expenses that you’ll want to budget for:

Shipping & Setup Costs:Depending on where you buy your mattress, you may have to cover the cost of shipping, in-home delivery and/or setup. If not included in the purchase price, expect to spend $50-$100 on shipping, and even more on white-glove in-home delivery. Some companies even offer removal of your old bed, for an additional fee. Many online companies now offer free shipping, so make sure to shop around.

Foundations & Accessories:Beyond the initial mattress purchase, you’ll also need to consider the cost of any accessories you will need. A foundation/box spring can be a major cost, and even small things like bedding can add up. The cost of these items varies significantly, but as with mattresses themselves, accessory prices tend to scale with the mattress size you purchase (so King accessories will cost significantly more than Twin). Likewise, odd sizes like California King and Twin XL are more difficult to find accessories for, and many options are more expensive for these sizes.

Warranty & Returns:Some mattress warranties – as well as return policies – have expenses associated with them. For instance, some manufacturers require the customer to pay for return shipping during a warranty claim, or there may be “restocking” fees associated with a product return. Be sure to check the terms of each policy before purchasing.

How Much Does a Good Mattress Cost?

Quick Overview

Mattresses sold today range in price from $150 or less to more than $5,000, but most shoppers can find the mattress they need for under $1,000. The price-point of a mattress depends on several factors, including type, size, height, material composition, and durability.

This guide offers shopping tips for comparing mattresses based on different factors and finding the right model for you and your sleep partner at a reasonable price.

Average Mattress Prices

Mattress type impacts the price-point more than any other factor. The price range of foam mattresses, for example, varies significantly from the price ranges of latex or hybrid models. The table below features current price ranges for five common mattress types; please note that the prices listed below are for Queen-size models. Click the links in the left-hand column to read our full analyses of each mattress type.

Mattress TypeLow Price RangeMedium Price RangeHigh Price RangeAverage Price-Point (Queen)
InnerspringLess than $700$700 to $1,200More than $1,200$1,038
FoamLess than $600$600 to $1,200More than $1,200$1,044
LatexLess than $1,500$1,500 to $2,500More than $2,500$1,971
HybridLess than $1,500$1,500 to $2,200More than $2,200$2,077
AirbedLess than $1,500$1,500 to $2,500More than $2,500$2,283

Cost Factors for Different Mattress Types

Next, let’s look at some factors that influence the price of different mattress types.

Cost Factors for Innerspring Mattresses

Here are some important considerations to make when looking at innersprings:

  • The price-point of an innerspring mattress is often tied to durability and lifespan. Cheaper models tend to feature polyfoam comfort layers and bonnell coils, which typically perform for three to five years. Costlier innersprings may feature memory foam or latex in the comfort layer and more durable coils — such as offset or continuous-wire coils — in the support core.
  • Some innersprings are constructed with pocketed (or fabric-wrapped) coils; it’s important to note that mattresses featuring at least two inches of memory foam and/or latex in the comfort layer and pocketed coils in the support core are technically considered hybrids, not innersprings.
  • Gauge (or thickness) can be used to determine how durable a mattress coil is; thicker low-gauge coils are more durable than thinner high-gauge coils.
  • Many mattress manufacturers list ‘coil count’ as a measure of quality and durability — and the price may reflect this — but coil count does not necessarily reflect the lifespan of an innerspring mattress.

Cost Factors for Foam Mattresses

Foam mattresses are typically priced using the following criteria:

  • Foam density plays a role in mattress durability, and is a key factor for foam mattress pricing. Low-density foams are softer and tend to deteriorate quickly, and are most often used in relatively cheap mattress models. High-density foams are firmer and tend to last longer; they are usually used in models with more expensive price-points.
  • Another key consideration is the type of foam used. Polyfoam (even high-density polyfoam) will degrade faster than most memory foams. As a result, the cost of an all-polyfoam mattress is usually much lower than the cost of a memory foam mattress. Likewise, mattresses with specialty memory foam (such as gel or copper-infused memory foam) are more expensive than those with standard memory foam.
  • Most sleepers feel more comfortable on memory foam than polyfoam. However, price-point does not appear to be a significant factor in customer experiences with memory foam compared to performance factors like firmness and conforming/pressure-relieving abilities. For this reason, shoppers may be able to find a memory foam mattress that suits their preferences at a relatively low price.

Cost Factors for Latex Mattresses

The price of a latex mattress is often determined by the following factors:

  • Latex in mattresses is produced using one of two processes. The Dunlop process produces denser and heavier latex that is most often used in support cores. The Talalay process produces lighter and less dense latex that is typically used in comfort layers. Talalay latex tends to be more expensive than Dunlop latex, but some mattresses contain both.
  • The price of a latex mattress will also depend on whether natural or synthetic latex is used. Natural latex is extracted from rubber trees and produced without fillers using either the Dunlop or Talalay process. Synthetic latex, on the other hand, is entirely manmade, but is still processed using the Talalay or Dunlop method. The differences in firmness and feel between natural and synthetic latex are negotiable. However, sleepers are much more susceptible to allergic reactions on natural latex.
  • An important distinction for shoppers is the difference between ‘natural latex’ and ‘100% natural latex’; the latter does not contain any fillers whatsoever, while the former may not be entirely natural. In some cases, mattresses sold as ‘natural latex’ are actually made of mostly synthetic latex.

Cost Factors for Hybrid Mattresses

Cost considerations for hybrid mattresses include the following points:

  • In order to be considered a true hybrid, a mattress must have at least two inches of memory foam and/or latex in the comfort system and a pocketed coil support core. Many mattresses are sold as hybrids, even though they don’t meet this criteria. For example, some models sold as hybrids feature latex and memory foam components, but the support core is made of polyfoam, not pocketed coils.
  • Some hybrids feature a layer of microcoils in the comfort system for added conforming and pressure relief. Models with microcoil layers are usually more expensive than standard foam-and-coil hybrids. However, customer satisfaction ratings between microcoil and non-microcoil hybrids are comparable, suggesting that these components do not play a significant role in sleeper experiences.

Cost Factors for Airbed Mattresses

An airbed is defined as any mattress that features air chambers in the support core, rather than foam or coil layers. Airbeds have the highest average price among all mattress types. When pricing airbed mattresses, consider the following:

  • Most airbeds sold today feature manual or remote controls that allow users to inflate or deflate air to match their comfort preferences; many can be toggled using online apps. Remote-control airbeds — especially ones that utilize smart-app technology — are almost always more expensive than manual-control models.
  • Airbeds with memory foam, latex and/or microcoils in the comfort layer are usually priced higher than those with standard polyfoam comfort systems.
  • Airbed prices somewhat correlate to mattress height, with thicker models being the more expensive option. The number of air chambers may also play a role; traditional airbeds have one to two air chambers, but some newer models have as many as six individual chambers (and cost more on average).

Cost Factors for a Bed Base

The bed base refers to the part of a bed that supports the mattress. Here are a few of the factors to consider when you’re thinking about purchasing a bed base to hold up your mattress.

  • Box springs are generally cheaper than other kinds of bed bases, but may require an additional foundation or legs if you want storage space underneath. It’s worth noting that box springs can help to extend the lifespan of your mattress, preventing deterioration and sagging.
  • Foundations or platforms tend to be on the less expensive side. Like box springs, they can help to add value to your mattress purchase by extending its lifespan. They are generally set up to have storage space below, so there probably won’t be a need for extra purchases like with box springs.
  • There are a few factors that can make your bed base pricier. Some foundations have extra storage drawers and/or headboards, for example. These are often more expensive.
  • Adjustable beds, which can be raised at the head or foot to create different angles for sleeping, are the priciest options. Still, they can be important for certain kinds of sleepers, such as people with poor circulation, sleep apnea, or other sleep problems. If you have certain sleep conditions, the price of an adjustable bed base may be well worth it for higher-quality sleep over time.

Which Mattress Type Is Best for You?

Now that we’ve explored cost factors affecting the price of a mattress, let’s look at some distinct qualities associated with different mattress types. Customers can use metrics like these to determine which mattress is best for them based on their top priorities as shoppers and sleepers.

Mattress TypeInnerspringFoamLatexHybridAirbed
Average lifespan5 to 7 years6 to 7 years8 years or longer6 to 7 years8 years or longer
Conforming abilityPoor to FairGood to Very GoodGoodGood to Very GoodGood
SexGood to Very GoodFairFair to GoodGood to Very GoodFair
Temperature neutralityGood to Very GoodPoor to FairFair to GoodFair to GoodFair to Good
Noise potentialFairVery Good to ExcellentVery Good to ExcellentGood to Very GoodFair to Good
Odor potentialGood to Very GoodPoor to FairFair to GoodPoor to FairFair to Good
Edge supportGood to Very GoodPoor to FairPoor to FairGood to Very GoodFair to Good
AvailabilityWideWideModerateModerateVery Limited

Additional Mattress Costs

The original price-point is not the only cost associated with mattress ownership. Here are a few more costs that may arise for mattress owners:

  • Foundations:Mattress customers usually have the option of purchasing a matching foundation to go with their new mattress; most foundations are priced at $150 or higher.
  • Shipping:Many mattress manufacturers offer free delivery to customers in the continental United States; these deliveries are mostly coordinated through UPS, FedEx and other ground courier services. A few manufacturers also offer free shipping to customers in Alaska, Hawaii, and offshore U.S. territories, but most impose shipping charges of at least $100 for these locations; additional fees may also apply for customers in remote locations in the continental U.S. For companies that do not offer free mattress shipping, customers should expect to pay at least $100.
  • In-Home Assembly:A large number of mattress companies offer delivery that includes in-home mattress assembly and packaging waste removal; this is often called ‘White Glove delivery’. The standard cost of White Glove delivery is $99, but some companies charge more.
  • Old Mattress Removal:Mattress companies that offer White Glove delivery will often remove the customer’s old mattress for an additional charge (usually $50). However, most mattress companies that use ground couriers like UPS and FedEx for deliveries do not offer this service.
  • Mattress Returns:Mattress sleep trials are common; most companies allow customers to return their mattress within 30 to 90 days of their original purchase in exchange for a refund (specific lengths vary by company). However, many sleep trials include hidden ‘shipping and handling’ fees for customers that return their mattress during the sleep trial. These details are usually included in the fine print of the company’s sleep trial and return policy.
  • Mattress Exchanges:In addition to mattress returns, some companies allow customers to exchange their mattress during their sleep trial for a model of a different size and/or firmness. The same ‘shipping and handling’ fees apply. For mattress upgrades, customers will be required to pay the difference in price between the original and the replacement. Typically, one exchange is allowed per sleep trial.

Warranty Costs

A standard mattress warranty should last at least 10 years. Some span 25 years or longer. Warranty terms vary significantly between mattress manufacturers, and there are several costs associated with them.

Most mattress warranties require customers to cover shipping and handling fees associated with repairs for mattresses with defects (such as deep indentations or protruding coils). Additionally, customers should expect to pay shipping and handling fees for replacing their defective mattress with a new model.

Another important warranty consideration is whether the coverage is nonprorated or prorated; some warranties are entirely nonprorated, while others are nonprorated for a set number of years and prorated for the remainder of the warranty coverage period. Nonprorated coverage means that, with the exception of shipping and handling fees, owners do not need to pay extra costs for replacing a defective mattress. During prorated coverage periods, customers must pay extra charges for replacing their mattress; these charges are calculated by multiplying a percentage of the original mattress price (typically 5% to 10%) by the number of years of ownership.

For example, let’s say a mattress costs $1,000 and is covered under a 20-year warranty with five years of nonprorated coverage and 15 years of prorated coverage with a 5% prorated charge. If the mattress needs to be replaced during the first five years, then the owner will only be required to pay shipping and handling fees. If the mattress needs to be replaced during the tenth year, then prorated charges are calculated as 10 (years) by 5%; this means that the owner will be responsible for paying half the original price (or $500) to have the mattress replaced. During the eleventh year, this charge will increase to 55% (or $550), and so on until the 20-year period ends.

Most – but not all – 10-year warranties are entirely nonprorated. Some warranties that extend 15 to 20 years or longer are fully nonprorated, but most included prorated coverage periods. In some cases, a mattress warranty will only include two to three years of nonprorated coverage. For this reason, customers should place more emphasis on the length of the nonprorated coverage period than the overall warranty length. Furthermore, most industry experts agree that a mattress should be replaced every seven to eight years; this somewhat negates the need for warranties that extend beyond 10 years.

How to Get the Best Deal on a Mattress

When you’re looking for the best possible deal on a mattress, there are a number of factors that come into play. Here are a few tricks and tips, as well as some important factors to consider when looking for a great mattress deal.

Research

It’s important to do your homework when you’re looking for the best deal on a mattress. Conduct market research before you buy, and you’ll end up with a higher-value purchase in the end.

Mattresses vary widely in terms of durability, firmness, prices, and overall quality. Compare customer reviews and brand prices in order to get the most value for what you pay.

Holiday sales

Date-specific deals are huge in the mattress industry. If you time your purchase correctly, you can save quite a bit on your mattress. Here are some of the most common holidays and other sales days when you might snag a mattress deal:

HolidayDateSale Description
President’s Day3rd Monday in FebruaryPresident’s Day is usually the first opportunity all year to celebrate with mattress savings. Virtually all online mattress sellers provide brand-new coupon codes for this holiday.
Memorial DayLast Monday in MayMany mattress brands offer Memorial Day promotions. Brick-and-mortar stores may have some savings, but online mattress companies will usually provide ultra-steep price cuts and special deal throughout Memorial Day weekend.
Independence DayJuly 4thAlong with fireworks and outdoor barbecues, mattress sales have become synonymous with Independence Day. Okay, maybe not quite the same, but July 4th does bring significant mattress savings every year. While many stores close on this holiday, look for sales on the 3rd or 5th.
Amazon Prime DayJuly 15thThis midsummer sales day provides endless deals for members of Amazon Prime. Even if you’re not a Prime member, though, other mattress sellers will often publish new coupon codes on their own sites to draw customers away from Amazon, so scour various sites for deals.
Labor DayFirst Monday in SeptemberLabor Day has long been a major discount day for the mattress industry. Starting on the Friday before the holiday, look for new coupon codes, steep discounts, and other promotions at online mattress retailers.
Veterans DayNovember 11thNew coupon codes and promos almost always come out on Veterans Day. This mid-November discount opportunity is an especially good time to look out for great deals before the holidays, as mattress companies try to sell as much of their inventory as possible before the approaching winter rush.
Black FridayThe day after Thanksgiving, or the fourth Friday in NovemberBlack Friday is a massive sales event for both e-commerce and brick-and-mortar retailers. Because it’s a weekend-long event, and because so many sellers are competing with one another, you can usually find a steal just after Thanksgiving with a little research and price-matching offers.
Cyber MondayMonday after Thanksgiving (may fall in late November or early December)This e-commerce sales holiday boasts a longer discount window than most other discount days, with some sales lasting the entire week or even longer. Sellers actively compete in a race to the bottom of the price barrel on this post-Thanksgiving holiday, so if you’re looking for the ultimate steal, this is a good time to find one. Be on the lookout for extra perks on Cyber Monday, too, like free bedding and shipping.
Get a friend referral

If you have a friend who recently bought a mattress or is looking to buy one, you could save money on your own mattress purchase. Some retailers offer a referral deal on your purchase when someone who purchases a mattress (or, in some cases, other furniture or household goods) refers you to the company.

Choose a brand that offers free shipping

Buying a mattress online is often cheaper than buying one in person, and most retailers offer their products on the web in today’s market. Many companies offer free shipping, which is a major perk.

If you can dodge the shipping costs, online is often the best way to go when it comes to buying a mattress. On the web, you can almost always find a great mattress deal, with no markups from third-party retailers.

Consider durability

Ultimately, one of the best ways to save money in the long-term is to get a mattress that will last you a long time. When it comes to mattress value, the price point is just one small piece of the puzzle: A mattress that you can use comfortably for many years to come is key.

Do market research on the most durable mattresses. Read customer reviews to make sure the mattress will last a long time for the price you’ll be paying.

Conclusion

Generally speaking, the average sleeper will be able to spend $1,000 or less for a mattress that suits their comfort and support preferences. However, mattress shoppers are urged to thoroughly research different products before making a purchase. In order to find the right mattress at the lowest available price, be sure to compare different models based on factors like type, material composition, firmness, and durability, as well as company policies regarding shipping and delivery, sleep trials, and warranty coverage.

To view and compare different mattress brands based on price, please visit our Product Comparison Page.

Why are people obsessed with Casper mattresses? I slept on one for three years to find out

The best mattress is the one you stop thinking about.

Updated September 24, 2019

Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

If you’re shopping for a new mattress, you’ve probably had to wade through an ocean of jargon and about a million photos of people smiling as they recline on (let’s face it) identical-looking, spongy white rectangles. I’ve been there, too.

As traditional retailers like Mattress Firm and Sears disappear, online purchasing has only gotten more prevalent. And while shop-at-home convenience and money-back guarantees are a huge draw, I had a hard time distinguishing the actual differences between all the mattress-in-a-box brands like Leesa, Tuft & Needle, Purple, Nectar and others.

But after reading reviews until my eyes watered, I took the plunge and purchased a Casper mattress (available at Amazon for $995.00) . That was over three years, and here’s what I can tell you as a Casper owner: I’m satisfied.

(Note:In the interim since I bought my Casper, the team at Reviewed began in-depth mattress testing. Collectively, our favorite is Nectar, which was praised for striking an ideal firmness/softness balance. However, I still love my Casper, which only serves to further underscore the subjective nature of mattress reviewing. Comfort is king, after all, and I’m sleeping just fine.)

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Shopping for a new mattress usually starts at 3 A.M., sleepless and in the dark.

I complained about our old mattress for at least two years before I did anything about it. Waking up achy after a night of tossing and turning on a squeaky old bed, throwing another “We really oughta’…” onto a pile of empty threats before heading for the shower.

How many times did I hear Marc Maron or one of the countless other podcasters extol the virtues of a Casper mattress before I finally took a chance? How many mattress reviews beyond this did I read before pulling the trigger? Too many, in retrospect.

I bought a Casper mattress over three years ago, but it took about a year before I realized just how much I liked it. How did I finally know? Because I stopped thinking about mattresses altogether—truly the hallmark of a mattress doing its job.

Mattresses are unique among the things we own. We spend more time with them than any other consumer good (except perhaps our phones), yet we really only consider them when they’re either brand-new or when they’re utterly failing.

There are undoubtedly better mattresses out there. Oprah sleeps on a $100,000 bed. I do not sleep on a $100,000 bed. I sleep on an $800 bed and I’m very happy. Here’s why.

Unboxing a Casper mattress is an event unto itself

If owning a Casper mattress is blessedly unmemorable, getting one delivered sure makes an impression. Unlike traditional mattresses, it comes rolled up like a spring-loaded burrito. At 70 pounds (for the full size), it’s about twice as heavy as the mattress we were replacing and proved comically difficult to get up the stairs.

Unboxing it was just plain fun. Casper clearly put a lot of thought into designing the experience—right down to the little letter opener-style knife to slice open the shrink wrap without damaging the mattress. We just had to make sure the mattress was in position on the bed frame before we cracked it open.

The final cutting away proved, thankfully, less explosive than anticipated. Rather, the mattress’ foam layers unfurl and expand as it takes its first deep breath in your new home. Just thinking about it makes me want to go home and crawl into bed for a quick nap. (Keep reading. I’m just resting my eyes.)

Sure it looks small, but that box is CRAZY heavy. Still worth it, though.

It’s tough to argue with a 100-day return policy.

The extended money-back guarantee—a 40-day trial period when I bought mine, and now up to 100 days—was ultimately the factor that got me to click “buy.” I figured that takes a fair amount of confidence from a manufacturer. It’s way more than enough time for back sleepers, stomach sleepers and side sleepers to figure out whether the pressure points inherent in their old mattresses have been done in by Caper.

If you pause to think about it, they can’t resell a used mattress. Plus they have to spend cash on a delivery team just to pick it up from your house—there’s no way you’re going to put this thing back in the box yourself. This is some amazing customer service.

In Casper, I saw a company putting its money where its mouth was. I was convinced.

The best mattress in the world? Probably not. But the right one for me.

I can say with certainty that Pinocchio’s in Harvard Square and Otto’s are tied for the best pizza in Cambridge, MA because I’ve had pizza from basically every joint in the city. I’m an authority.

My dog (who’s obviously intelligent) also loves hanging out on the new mattress.

I cannot say that Casper is the best mattress in the world for precisely the same reason. I haven’t slept on every mattress in the world. This is also why I’m not going to bore you with a bunch of facts about foam density or how it stacks up against Purple, Tuft & Needle, and other new-school mattress companies that have sprung up. I can read the spec chart as well as anyone, but I can’t testify to their actual differences. (Update:the rest of the Reviewed team has begun testing mattresses since this article was originally published.)

I’m speaking purely from personal experience. But in my defense, I always do my homework and I’m pretty damn opinionated about products. Also, my satisfaction with Casper seems to be in good company amongst the mattress nerds. It’s not a firm mattress. It’s not a soft mattress. It’s just the right mattress for me—and very likely, for you as well.

I purchased the full-size and only paid a little more than I did for my iPhone, and I don’t rely onthatto keep my vertebrae in their right place, do I? Some things are worth investing in.

Bottom line: I bought a Casper and then I stopped thinking about mattresses. Don’t you wish you could say the same?

What are the different kinds of Casper mattresses?

When I purchased three years ago, Casper only offered one variety of mattress, available in all the usual sizes. Since then, the line has expanded to include additional mattresses options, as well as pillows, bedding, bed frames… even a dog bed.

The original Casper mattress is still sold today and is simply calledThe Casper, and starts at $595 ($995 or less for a queen). It’s the most popular model they sell. You have the option for all-foam or a hybrid of foam and springs for an additional $100.

The Waveis the upgrade model. Starting at $1,295 ($2,395 for a queen), it costs significantly more but promises more layers, more support, and a cooler night’s rest for hot sleepers.

The Essentialis the starter model. From $395 ($600 for a queen), it’s slightly thinner and has the fewest layers.

Where to try or buy a Casper

Casper was formerly an online-only business, which was a huge part of its appeal. You got to skip the hellscape of a traditional mattress store and try out the mattress in your own home for over three months.

Now, however, there are several options for seeing a Casper in-person before you buy. There are a select number of Casper Sleep Shops (see store locator), little boutiques that focus solely on Casper products. Target, an investor in Casper, also floors them in many locations. West Elm used to carry them, but it appears that they’re now partnering with Leesa.

All retailers charge the same price for Casper mattresses, including Amazon. If you see a suspiciously low sale price, double-check that it’s not some weirdo selling you a used mattress. All legit retailers should also offer the same 100-day return policy.

How Much Does a Good Mattress Cost? A 2020 Guide to Understanding Mattress Value

Thinking about buying a new bed but unsure of how much money you should set aside for the purchase? Confused about the difference between innerspring, latex, and foam beds? If so, look no further.

Mattresses come in a wide range of prices, from less than $200 to over $5,000. How expensive a mattress is will depend on a range of factors, such as durability, materials, and height. Higher-priced beds (luxury mattresses) also tend to last much longer than cheaper ones.

This article will cover differences between each popular mattress type and what you can expect to pay for them, along with other factors that impact overall mattress cost.

Differences between Popular Mattress Types

Should you get an innerspring bed, memory foam, latex, or some other type of mattress? Let’s look closer at each of the most common mattress materials.

Innerspring Mattresses

Innerspring beds use a bed of coils for their main support, though the shape, quality, and design of the coils can vary widely. Considered the most traditional type of mattress, innerspring beds are covered by upholstery materials, like fiber or foam. Some innerspring beds have two layers of coils instead of just one.

These beds are best for people who carry some extra weight since the coils create a firm core that won’t sag as easily as other materials. An innerspring mattress can also work for someone who knows for sure they enjoy a bouncy bed with this type of firm support.

While these are often the most affordable types of mattresses out there, many sleepers will find them uncomfortable if they don’t have enough padding. This is one of the reasons why hybrid mattresses are gaining in popularity for people who enjoy the feel of innerspring coils but also want plush comfort in their bed. We’ll cover more on hybrid mattresses shortly.

Latex Mattresses

Latex is a supportive material that can relieve pressure, like memory foam, but it has a couple of distinct differences. Firstly, latex is a slightly bouncy material, rather than slow-responding, like memory foam. Latex can be made from either natural material (like tree sap) or with synthetic compounds.

Whether it’s made from natural materials or not, latex is a hypoallergenic material, as it is quite resistant to dust mites and mold, which is beneficial for people who have allergies.

Latex mattresses are also known to be durable and sleep cool since you sleep on top of the mattress rather than in it, as you do with memory foam. If you want a bouncy, cool mattress and are sensitive to allergens, latex could be your best bet.

Foam Mattresses

Memory foam is a viscoelastic material, meaning that it can change shape and go back to its original form afterward. Instead of having a bouncy feel, memory foam responds slowly to pressure. Highly soft and absorbent, memory foam mattresses conform to your body, distributing your weight evenly and possibly relieving aches and pains.

This material also comes with the benefit of absorbing motion. If you sleep with a pet or restless partner, memory foam will absorb the vibrations from their movements, helping you stay asleep.

Memory foam is known for sleeping hot since you sink into the material. Most modern mattress companies have found ways to combat this with cooling technology, though, such as cooling gel.

Memory foam is a durable material that will last quite a while, as well. Tempur-Pedic memory foam mattresses, for example, last for up to 10 years, according to customers. If you want a luxurious bed and know you enjoy the cradling feeling created by memory foam, this could be a good option for your next bed.

Hybrid Mattresses

Hybrid mattresses combine the support of coils and the plush comfort of latex or memory foam. These mattresses aren’t as bouncy as innerspring beds but are still easy to move around on and they do have some bounce to them. The latex or memory foam layers on top of the springs help to absorb motion, so you probably won’t be too disturbed when your partner moves at night.

If you sleep hot, a hybrid mattress could work well for you. They tend to sleep fairly cool because the coils in the mattress prevent the sleeper from sinking too far into the surface of the bed. Just keep in mind that hybrid beds are very heavy because they contain both coils and foam or latex, which can make them difficult to move.

Overall, this kind of bed should work well for someone who wants the firm support of coils, a responsive bed, and a bit of contouring pressure relief.

Air Mattresses

An air bed (also called an air mattress) is a bed that uses air chambers as the support system, rather than coil or foam layers. Permanent air beds can be used as the main mattress for your bedroom and tend to cost a lot, although there are also cheaper inflatable mattresses used for camping and outdoors.

If versatility is your main concern and you aren’t shopping for a main bedroom mattress, a cheap air bed could work for you. Budget camping air mattresses tend to cost less than innerspring, memory foam, latex, or hybrid beds and are easier to move. Some models can be used as a guest bed, or as a permanent mattress in your bedroom, in addition to being used outdoors.

One major advantage to an air mattress is that you can adjust the firmness level by adding more air to make it firmer and less to make it softer. This makes it more versatile than most other mattress types and can be helpful when you have different guests with varying preferences over.

Another benefit to air mattresses is that they won’t sag in the middle, like foam or coil beds can, and if they do, you can simply add more air.

How Much does Each Mattress Type Cost?

he materials used in a mattress will have the greatest impact on price, compared to other factors. We’ll cover what you can expect to pay for each type below:

  • Innerspring:These tend to cost between $700 and $1,200, with an average price of about $950 for a Queen.
  • Latex:Latex beds will cost between $1,500 and $2,500 on average, with the most common price being around $2,000 for a Queen.
  • Memory foam:Memory foam beds often cost between $600 and $1,200, with an average price of $900 for a Queen.
  • Hybrid:Hybrid beds usually run between $1,200 and $2,000, with an average price of about $1,650 for a Queen.
  • Airbed:Air mattresses cost between $1,500 and $2,500 on average for a permanent model you can use in your bedroom. A Queen will likely cost around $2,250.

What Impacts the Cost of Each Mattress Type?

For each type of mattress, there are different factors that will impact price point. Below, we’ll go over each mattress type and cover some of the most common of these factors.

Innerspring Mattress Cost Factors

Durability:Expected lifespan and durability will play a key role in the price point of an innerspring bed. The cheapest options on the market will usually only last for three to five years, whereas more expensive models, with more durable coils, may last a few years longer.

Coil count:Fancier innerspring mattress models tend to have a higher coil count, although this doesn’t always determine how long a mattress will last. Higher coil counts can provide better support and contouring, so try to select a mattress with a coil count of at least 300 for a Full bed, 400 for a Queen, and 480 for a King.

Coil Gauge:Coil gauge refers to how thick each coil is in the mattress. High-gauge coils are thinner with a springier and softer feel, and low-gauge coils are thicker with firmer pushback and thus more durable.

Pocketed coils:Some innerspring manufacturers make their mattresses with pocketed coils. Wrapping each coil in fabric can reduce motion transfer and noise significantly, so this quality does usually drive up the price of innerspring beds.

Latex Mattress Cost Factors

Natural versus synthetic latex:How much a latex mattress will cost can depend on whether the manufacturer uses synthetic or natural latex materials. While natural latex is made from rubber trees, synthetic latex is manmade. Natural latex is more expensive to make, so you can expect to pay more for a mattress made with it.

Manufacturing process:The synthetic latex used in mattresses is made with either the Dunlop process or Talalay process. Dunlop latex is heavier and denser than Talalay latex, which makes it more suitable for support layers. The Talalay process is less dense, adds cushion, and typically costs more than Dunlop latex. Some latex mattresses use both Dunlop and Talalay latex.

Number of layers used:Latex beds can have a varying number of layers used in their construction, which will impact the overall price and comfort of the finished product. The thicker a mattress is, the more it tends to cost.

Memory Foam Mattress Cost Factors

Type of foam used:The type of foam used in a memory foam mattress is probably the biggest determiner when it comes to price. Polyfoam is a common material used in budget memory foam mattresses, but with the lower price tag comes a mattress that degrades quicker. Mattresses with special properties in their foam, such as cooling gel or copper-infusion, will cost more than basic foam beds.

Foam density:The density of the foam used in a mattress will impact how durable it is and therefore it also affects the price. The low-density foam used in many cheaper memory foam beds is less durable and tends to deteriorate faster. Denser, firmer foams are used in more expensive beds and tend to last longer.

Airflow:Some types of foam come in a convoluted (egg crate-shaped) design. This structure can promote airflow, helping the mattress sleep cooler, but may end up driving up the price of the bed.

Hybrid Mattress Cost Factors

Quality of foam or latex used:The type of foam or latex used in a hybrid mattress will end up impacting how much the bed costs. If the mattress uses foam with cooling technology, it may end up costing more. A hybrid that uses natural latex, instead of synthetic, might also end up costing more.

Number of layers:Hybrid beds can vary widely when it comes to the number of layers used in the mattress. Since beds with more layers require more materials and a more complex manufacturing process, they will cost more than thinner beds with fewer layers.

Quality of coils:Micro-coils are basically similar to ordinary mattress coils but much smaller. They’re made with high-gauge, flexible wire and increase the overall flexibility of a mattress, adding to the conforming ability of the bed. Since these are a relatively new feature, beds with micro-coils may end up costing more than beds without them.

Airbed Mattress Cost Factors

Remote controls:Most air mattresses today come with remote or manual controls that let you inflate or deflate your mattress according to your preference. Some can even be controlled via online apps but these are more expensive than beds that use manual controls.

Extra materials:If an air mattress comes with additional comfort materials like latex, memory foam, or a micro-coil system, they will cost more than beds without these features.

Mattress height:When it comes to airbeds, the price be related to the height of the mattress. If the bed is taller, it will often cost more, as will a bed that has more air chambers.

Other Factors that Impact Mattress Price

There are a number of other factors that may affect the cost of a mattress, regardless of the type of bed it is. Here are some additional things to consider when it comes to the final price of your bed:

Shipping costs:While many manufacturers will give you free delivery when you order a mattress for them, some will charge a shipping fee. If you live in offshore U.S. territories, Hawaii, or Alaska, you can definitely expect to pay some additional shipping costs. For manufacturers that don’t offer free shipping with their beds, you can expect to pay $100 or more.

Returns:If you end up returning your mattress, you might have to pay a fee. Most online mattress companies offer sleep trials that allow customers to test out their bed before deciding whether to keep it. A lot of these trials come with fees for shipping and handling, so make sure you check the fine print in the company policy before you buy.

White Glove delivery:A high percentage of mattress manufacturers offer a service called White Glove delivery. This includes in-home assembly of your new mattress and packaging waste removal. This can cost anywhere from $99 on up.

Foundations:Depending on whether you need to buy a mattress foundation and what type you select, this could add quite a bit to your final bed price. Most mattresses will have options for foundations under the same brand name and these can cost anywhere from $150 on up.

In most cases, an average sleeper should be able to get their mattress for less than $1,000, although some may have higher comfort needs or preferences. Before you buy, make sure you research not only the quality of materials used and user reviews, but also the company’s warranty, sleep trial period, and shipping costs.

How Much Does a Latex Mattress Cost?

When shopping and comparing latex mattress retailers, or any other product for that matter, any sane consumer is going to haveprice as one of their prioritized considerations. Money doesn’t grow on trees!

Money is a finite resource, and most people need to consider cost, and what their budget can handle first, before making an investment in a premium quality consumer item like a latex mattress. It’s a given.Spoiler alert: PlushBeds is NOT the lowest price latex mattress vendor you’ll find. BUT, given our model of being a manufacturer rather than a reseller, being an Internet-only merchant (the same latex mattresses we sell online would ultimately be priced north of 50% higher on a brick and mortar mattress retail showroom floor because of commissions and overhead), our reputation and relations, sourcing the absolute highest quality latex available (we are the world’s largest importer of ARPICO organic latex, a pioneer and Global Organic Latex Standard and USDA organic certified rubber tree plantation in Sri Lanka), plus a whole litany of 3 rd party certifications and endorsements of our product (we carry the “Mercedes” of certifications – GreenGuard Gold, which less than 1% of all mattresses can lay claim to),we believe that you’ll find no better VALUE for your money than one of our premium quality 100% natural and organic latex mattresses.Just ask John, our friendly, affable, and witty sales manager, who also has a charming accent. After speaking with him, you’ll come to understand whyour mattresses are not the same as competitor’s mattress. In fact, the main commonness we have with X or Y competing latex mattresses is that they are both rectangles😊!(You’ll no doubt have an eye-opening conversation with him; he can be reached at 1-888-758-7423. He knows the competition like the back of his hand!). What’s more,you’ll end up SPENDING LESS in the long run for our flagship, high-end Botanical Bliss organic latex mattress than you would even a decent innerspring mattress that you’ll need to replace 5 times in the span of time that you will own one of our Botanical Bliss latex mattresses.

What if You Learned That You Could be Sleeping in the “Lap of Luxury” for Less Than 25 Cents Per Night?

Here’s a question for you: wouldn’t you be willing to spend slightly less than one quarter, 25 CENTS, to get an unimaginably AMAZING night’s sleep. Our natural latex is going to last longer, be more durable and resilient, and feel so much better than just about ANY sleep surface that you’ll be able to find – ANYWHERE! Heck, you’ll spend multiples on that for your cuppa joe that you’re drinking at Starbucks every day, then why not “splurge” (25 cents per day, people! Remember, we are talking 20-25 years of lifespan here.) for an all-natural latex mattress. As it comes to mattresses, as with many things in life, you eitherPay Now, orPay Later… It’s a tradeoff, pay a little bit more now for a MUCH longer lasting, premium quality mattress, or pay later by paying again and again for a cheap mattress that needs to be replaced every 5-7 years. Can’t afford it, you may be thinking? The great thing is,we offer financing via Affirm, a highly reputable and well-established online financing company, where you make easy monthly payments over 3, 6, or 12 months. And, all you have to do is enter a few bits of information for a real-time decision. It’s a no-brainer. There are absolutely no hidden fees, you’ll know upfront exactly how much it is going to cost you, and it won’t affect your credit score to check your eligibility.

Is a Hybrid Okay; How About Synthetic Latex? Or do You Want the Real Deal: All-Natural or Organic Latex

If you are already sold on the benefits of a latex mattress as opposed to other mattress types (better spinal alignment during sleep, doesn’t sleep hot like memory foam, or cause you to feel like you are stuck in quicksand, and has little to no motion transfer between partners), one of the first things that you will need to consider is if you want an all-natural latex mattress, or will synthetic latex be enough to meet your expectations? If you want some cheesy cheap “latex mattress” sold on Amazon, for example, you won’t escape the reality of getting what you pay for. To avoid buyer’s remorse, we hope you’ll remember what Benjamin Franklin famously stated: “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten.” After all, you’ll be sleeping for 1/3 of your life, so doesn’t the quality of your mattress deserve a little bit more consideration than your set of wheels? Some people are willing to spend more money getting from Point A to Point B in a fancy schmancy vehicle that performs the same function as a much more affordable and economical model, but they won’t allocate that same consideration and investment towards healthy sleep. Go figure! As long as you understand that most “latex mattresses” are only partially latex (utilizing just a thin layer of latex foam on top of a much cheaper polyurethane core), or are completely synthetic latex or blended latex (around 30% natural latex, and up to 70% synthetic), at the very least you will understand going into the equation what you are getting.

And, It’s NOT About Paying the “Green” Premium, Either

Many individuals mistakenly perceive 100% natural latex as just part of the “going green” movement, and so go the route of synthetic latex material, believing and feeling that the synthetic latex experience will be “good enough”. But, there is certainly a distinction between the 100% natural latex mattress and the 100% latex mattress! Not only because of the elasticity of all-natural latex, but because of the durability and health-promoting benefits (remember, you’re not experiencing off gassing, or breathing in chemicals with the natural version). Natural latex mattresses have an elasticity that is unparalleled, and thus the feel and comfort that you will experience sleeping on one. As is the case with most manmade materials, you just can’t replicate what MOTHER NATURE has to offer! That is whywe warranty ours for 25 years, and have chosen to become the world’s largest importer of ARPICO organic latex.

But Why Does All-Natural Latex Have to be So Expensive?!

If you’ve read this far, and studied a bit on your own, you should know that there is probably no more comfortable sleep surface to be found. Why? Because natural latex will cradle you like a baby, and contour to your every curve. But, natural latex ISN’T cheap, although as we’ve made the case for above, it isless expensivein the LONG RUN. Regarding cost: it takes the output of 12 acres, or 2,500 rubber trees being tapped for their sap just to get the amount of latex to make the core of one single queen-sized mattress. And, the molds to make natural latex mattresses can cost in excess of $10,000 each!

Then, with the Talalay latex mattress procedure there are extra steps to be taken to equally distribute the latex particles and even out the air bubbles so it is less dense, and an overall softer mattress. Dunlop mattresses by comparison are much denser and take less effort to make, thus the cost factor is less of an issue. We’re talking hundreds of dollars less. But, to make the truest and highest quality latex mattress, like our Botanical Bliss, it takes the best of both worlds – a durable and dense mattress core so that your mattress will last as long as it’s warrantied for, plus an airier, softer comfort layer on top, so you can experience the bliss in sleep that is our namesake. We don’t take any shortcuts!

How Our Customer Service and Guarantee Fit In

By now you understand considerably more about what goes into the price of your PlushBeds latex mattress, and what other latex mattresses purport to be and what they don’t include. But, given that we offer superior pricing on the best quality mattress, what if you still aren’t satisfied? It’s all for not if you don’t get great customer service. We have hundreds and hundreds of independent online reviews. We stand behind our product. And, unlike others, who you don’t find out until later that you’ll be paying up the wazoo to pay shipping for returning your mattress,we take on all the risk of your mattress purchasing decision! That’s another reason why we are ultimately less expensive when you look at the big picture. Returns are free. Free as inzero dollars.No fine print; no gimmicks. A totally transparent return policy. And as far as customer service goes, the ladies we have operating our virtual chat resource on our website are some of the most patient and hand-holding product support people you’ll find in the whole industry. They excel at having a cheery and helpful disposition, and will answer your every last question with supreme patience and understanding of your particular situation. It’s how we’ve earned the reputation that has taken us years to earn.

Brass Tacks… What is it Going to Set Me Back, Already?!

Glad you asked 😊. You’ll find the pricing to be transparent and forthcoming. No hunting around for prices, or having to call to get a quote. A queen-sized mattress is the most popular size, and our 9” Botanical Bliss is the most popular depth. With latex prices at the rate they are currently (this can change, since latex is a commodity that has many factors influencing its availability), the queen Botanical Bliss is currently priced at $1,799, which includes your choice of Soft, Medium, or Medium-Firm (Extra-Firm is $225 more). Also included in your natural latex mattress purchase is a free gift of two natural latex pillows. So, go ahead and shop around, but in the end, once you digest the value of what we have to offer vs. what everyone else is offering, and everything stated above, we believe you’ll find us to be the leader in the space, and find our Botanical Bliss organic latex mattress to be the best you’ll find. And, all of this at less than 25 cents per night, once you consider it lasting to 25 years. Can you afford not to own one? Just think of what this will do for your sleep!

Link to Us!

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