How Long To Keep Crib Mattress

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Find Out How Long Crib Mattresses Are Good For

As adults, we put a lot of emphasis on our own mattresses. We spend a lot of time evaluating comfort, durability, firmness, and cooling. And, of course, we want the best quality at a reasonable price.

The consideration we put into our child’s mattress, especially for a crib, should be even more thorough. After all, it’s not just about comfort for your baby or toddler (though that’s important, too!); safety is also a top priority.

When you’re looking to get a new bed for your bundle of joy (see our top crib picks), you’ll naturally also wonder how long it will last, if you can use it down the road if you have another child, and even if you can accept a hand-me-down from a well-meaning friend or family member.

In this article, we’ll discusshow long crib mattresses lastand address the above inquiries, too!

How and when should I move my child from a crib to a bed?

There’s no set time when you have to replace your child’s crib with a regular or toddler bed, although most children make the switch sometime between ages 1 1/2 and 3 1/2.

It’s often best to wait until your child is closer to 3, since many little ones just aren’t ready to make the transition. Of course, you’ll need to move your toddler to a bed when he’s simply too big or too active to sleep in a crib anymore.

Many parents make the switch because they’re worried that their active toddler might climb or jump out of his crib — and this is a real safety concern. But it’s best not to react to climbing out of the crib or any other sudden sleep problem with a sense of alarm.

Don’t rush right out and buy a new bed the day your toddler first climbs out of the crib. He may not be ready to move to a bed, and it may not be safe for him to be up and about during the night when everyone else is asleep. Buy yourself some time by lowering the crib mattress as far as possible, so the side rails are relatively higher and more difficult to climb over.

Another reason parents make the switch to a bed is the impending arrival of another baby. If this is your situation, make the switch at least six to eight weeks before you’re due. You want your toddler well settled in his new bed before he sees the baby taking over "his" crib. Depending on your toddler’s age, you could also consider delaying the switch until the new baby is 3 or 4 months old. Your newborn will probably spend those months sleeping in a bassinet anyway, and your toddler will have time to adjust to the new baby, making the transition to a bed easier when it does happen.

Be sure to base the timing of the switch on your child’s readiness rather than on the need to free up the crib, however. Many parents find out too late that it would have been easier to borrow or buy another crib rather than move their older child to a bed before he was ready.

Some children adjust readily to this change, while others have a hard time with it. Every child is different. It’s not unusual, though, for firstborn children to resist the transition. He may be very attached to his crib and all of his associations with it. The move to sleeping in a bed is just one of many changes at this stage in a toddler’s life — it may coincide with toilet-training, starting preschool and other pressures to "grow up."

If a new baby’s on the way, your child may feel possessive of his baby things, including his crib. Later-born children often have an easier time making the switch to a bed because they want to be just like their older brother or sister. They’re eager to move from the crib, which is "for babies," into a "big-kid bed." However some toddlers, whether first- or later-born, are just plain ready and relish this change in their status.

To ease the transition, put your toddler’s new bed in the same place his crib used to be. If you’re using a twin bed, you may not want to make an immediate switch to grown-up sheets and blankets that are tucked in. Your child may find it soothing to continue to sleep with his old crib blanket, even if it’s too small. Don’t forget to put up a guardrail to prevent your newly liberated toddler from falling out of bed.

Get your toddler excited about having a "big-kid bed" by taking him with you to pick it out, if you’re buying it new, or by emphasizing its previous owner if that person is someone your child knows. For example: "This was your cousin’t bed, and now it’s yours! You’re almost as big as him now!" Let your toddler shop with you for new sheets featuring his favorite characters, and encourage him to show his "big-kid bed" to visiting friends and family.

Another tactic, although it requires a little more work, is to throw a "big-kid bed" party. Choose a date to unveil the new bed, and talk up the event a week in advance. On the big day, have a party and invite friends and grandparents.

Another strategy is the use of specific "toddler beds." They use a crib mattress, but look more like a regular bed. Many come with built-in guardrails, and some are made in very appealing themes and shapes, such as cars, trains and pink four-poster beds.

If you find that you’ve made the switch too soon and your toddler is upset, don’t give up right away. Encourage your child to try out the bed. If he’s still distraught after a few days, bring the crib back.

Some toddlers simply aren’t ready for a bed. It takes a certain amount of cognitive development for your child to understand that a bed has imaginary boundaries that he must stay within. If your great sleeper all of a sudden takes a long time to fall asleep at night, gets out of bed many times, or wanders around the house, he’s probably not ready for his own bed. As with potty-training, sometimes it’s worth taking a step back and bringing back the diapers — or in this case, the crib — and trying again later. Just be sure you don’t present the reappearance of the crib as a step backward in development or a punishment.

Finally, remember that the switch from a crib to a bed is a milestone inyourlife, too. It’s one more sign that your baby is growing up. Reflect on when you first set up the crib for your little one, and then go have a private celebration of your own.

How Long Do Mattresses Last? The Results May Shock You!

Mattresses are pretty expensive — one quick glance at our buyer’s guide will confirm this fact. This is why many people do not replace them – not even after many years of use.

They do not want to spend a lot of money on a new one. Besides, now you can delay the process of buying a new one if you do an excellent job at maintaining your existing one.So, how often should you replace your mattress?

It doesn’t matter which type of bed you have. Most of them are ready for replacement within ten years to ensure a good night’s rest (old mattresses can hurt your sleep quality). Besides, it can last beyond ten years on average, if the owners maintain it properly.

Also, many different factors affect a bed’s lifespan. You can extend its life expectancy by following a few easy steps in the text below. We prepared and wrote down some tips to boost its longevity.

How Long Do Mattresses Last?

Mattresses aren’t exactly cheap, most people replace them very infrequently and consider buying a new one either a chore or a burden. It’s easy to delay or prolong this process simply by taking proper care of whichever type you own. As a general rule, most should be replaced within ten years for best results in sleep and health, however, the average life of a mattress can last beyond ten years or more if taken care of properly. While it is true that how long one lasts depends on different factors, you can easily increase its life expectancy by undertaking a small number of simple steps. Here is a look at a few of the factors that can decide how long should a mattress last, and possible ways to increase its lifespan:

Table of Contents

1. The Type

What type do you have? For instance, is it air, innerspring, memory foam or latex? Each one has its own life expectancy; air and innerspring being the shortest, memory foam being mid length, while latex types are known to last the longest.

  • Air mattresses will over time either develop leaks or generally become less effective at retaining air pressure. If they have a built-in pump that becomes faulty, this too can lead to premature replacement. Overall, the average air mattress life expectancy is placed at five years.
  • Spring mattresses are good for sharing couples who like a springy and bouncy surface, but unfortunately, due to the inner core being thin metal wire, this type does tend to sag and lose its support even if flipped and rotated regularly. Even ones which have been well cared for will most likely need replacing within 7-8 years.
  • Memory foam mattresses are less prone to sagging but not invincible. They too require rotating, and foam does eventually lose its support but after a long while. This type should be good for at least ten years if kept ventilated, clean, and rotated.
  • Latex mattresses are the creme de la creme and tick all the boxes for quality and longevity. The naturally hypoallergenic and anti-microbial properties add to the durable nature of latex rubber foam to combine a core which can last up to 15 years.

2. Regular Cleaning

Another important factor which determines mattress life expectancy is to do with cleaning.Howdo you clean it? Do you clean itregularly? Do you give it to aprofessionalcleaner? It’s essential that you clean your mattress regularly to prolong the life. If you do not, it won’t last long at all. This is due to the invisible bacteria, mildew, and mattress mold that can slowly eat away at the materials involved. Moreover, it may be better if you could have it cleaned professionally from time to time, as mattresses are home to bacteria and germs in plenty, which might not get adequately cleansed with household cleaning products and methods.

3. Amount of Use

As you can imagine, anything that is used more will last less. However, there are two things that need to be kept in mind. Whichever type you own, it wouldn’t last as long in cases of extreme use, for example sharing couples who use for 10+ hours per day, and secondly on the other hand, if it has been left unused and uncleaned for prolong periods of time. Mattresses that are moderately used, where people sleep on it for around 7-8 hours a day, and then cleaned regularly are the ones that have the longest life.

4. The Cleaning Products

The question of how long do mattresses last really is to do with many supporting factors, but quite often depends on the cleaning methods used to clean them. For instance, in case of blood stains, you might have to use hydrogen peroxide to get rid. Too much of this chemical (and other heavy duty stain removers) would lead to a reduction of mattress life as these are not made to withstand such chemical uses.

5. Proper Precautions

It is always nice to have kids around the house. However, if your kids want to use your bed as a trampoline, it seriously isn’t a good idea. You would rather have them play elsewhere since this can seriously damage your bed. Imagine you have an innerspring, the springs will become too soft and compressed in no time at all and will leave you with a creaky and sagging surface. Additionally, whether it’s latex or memory foam, soon there will be indentations which are beyond repair. To prolong its life, you can also rotate and flip it from time to time, but that’s only if it’s double-sided and permits you to do so. You could perform this every few months for the duration of its life, which will significantly improve how long a mattress can last.

When Do You Know You Cannot Use Your Mattress?

Usually, mattresses that are over seven years old do not provide the comfort and support you need on the bed. Once you see there are signs of the surface and support wearing out, or you’re feeling uncomfortable in the bed when you are sleeping on it, you would be better off changing it. Some of the common visible signs of wearing are sagging, holes and tearing. If you cannot get a full night’s sleep and feel that you’re having a better slumber elsewhere than your bed, you need to start looking for a replacement.

You might buy the most expensive mattress, but if you do not care for it properly, it might not even last ten years. On the other side, ones which are taken care of correctly are known to last more than 15 years.

Crib Mattress Height: An Ages and Stages Guide

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Last Updated on January 16, 2020

Crib mattress height depends on your baby’s age, size, and abilities. Newborns and infants who are younger than 5 months old and cannot sit up can generally sleep safely on a crib mattress placed at the highest position. Once a baby can sit up, or is able to roll over or push up onto their hands and knees, you should lower the crib mattress to the halfway position. As soon as your baby shows signs of pulling up to standing, you should lower the crib mattress to the bottom level.

Keep reading to learn the ages and milestones you need to look out for when considering your baby’s crib mattress height.

Crib Mattress Height: Why It’s Important

According to a 19-year study published in the journalPediatrics,US emergency rooms treat an average of nearly 10,000 zero- to two-year-olds each year for crib, playpens or bassinet injuries. Of those, more than 80% involve cribs. Roughly 66% of injuries involving a fall from a crib, playpen or bassinet.

These statistics are as sobering as they are eye-opening.

Indeed, how you use your crib is just as important as choosing a safe crib mattress in terms of keeping babies safe.

And that includes helping parents and caregivers understand when they should lower their baby’s crib mattress.

Related Reading

Crib Mattress Height Regulations

Crib falls injure babies with shocking frequency. Given how common it is, it’s no surprise the federal government regulates crib mattress height. These guidelines are set-up to create “escape resistant” sleep environments for babies shorter than 35 inches tall.

In the United States, the minimum distance between the top of the lowest support and the top of the crib side rails is 26 inches. M ost full-size crib mattresses are between 5 and 6 inches thick. This means the actual distance between the top of the mattress and the top of the rails is 20 to 21 inches.

Falls from heights are a danger to babies in other parts of the home, too – that’s why we also don’t recommend a baby bathtub that sits on the counter or on a base.

Our Ages & Stages Guide to Crib Mattress Height

Place Crib Mattresses in the Highest Position for Newborns

As long as your baby can’t sit up and is under 5 months, the highest position is likely safe.

When your baby is a newborn, it’s fine to keep it in the highest position. This will make it easier on your back when you’re lifting baby out of the crib, make it more likely you’ll be able to put your baby down without waking them, and also ensure you’re able to support your baby’s neck properly when lifting in and out of the crib. (source)

As a rule of thumb, you can keep your baby’s mattress in the highest position as long as they’re immobile. Once they can start moving on their own – this includes rolling and sitting unsupported – it’s time to lower it.

Lower the Crib Mattress to the Middle Height for Infants

Once a baby can sit up by themselves, it’s time to lower the crib mattress.

By the time your baby is able to sit up, roll over, or push onto their hands and knees, you’ll want to have adjusted her mattress to the middle height (one notch down from the highest position).

Most babies are able to sit by themselves between 5 and 8 months of age. Once they’ve mastered rolling and sitting, babies generally work on pushing themselves up onto their hands and knees.

At this stage, the highest position can be dangerous, as your baby may try pulling themselves to standing at any moment.

Place the Crib Mattress at the Lowest Position for Older Babies and Toddlers

When your baby shows any signs of pulling themselves to standing, lower everything to the lowest setting. This will make it harder for your baby to climb out of their crib. Lowering the mattress at the right time reduces the risk of falls and injury.

At this stage, it’s also important to remove any crib bumpers or wedges from the crib. These items are unnecessary and potentially unsafe at any time. They become particularly problematic once your baby can stand. Babies can use them as a makeshift staircase to climb out of their crib.

Time for a Toddler Bed

Once your child begins to climb or reaches 35” in height, transition them to a toddler bed. You can also transition them to a toddler mattress, which doesn’t need to be as firm as a baby crib mattress.

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