How Long Should You Keep A Mattress Topper

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Why Memory Foam Mattress Toppers Wear Out Quickly

How Long Before You’re Forced To Replace Your Topper

You would think that toppers made of memory foam last as long as the beds made of the same material. But this is not the case. Not even Tempur-Pedic toppers last as long as their mattress counterparts. All other things being equal, amemory mattress topper has a shorter lifespan because:

Thickness- Memory foam toppers are generally thinner than the foam layers used in mattresses. Toppers that are too thin (only 1-2 inches thick) wear out quicker because when the cells at the top crumble, there is a less memory foam underneath to take their place and provide support.

Overlay- Memory toppers are generally laid over an existing mattress or bed. If the mattress underneath is already worn out and shows sagging, the topper will simply follow that contour and make the sag even more pronounced because of its soft nature. That may take some time to become permanent.

Overweight- Heavy and obese people may speed up the process by adding extra pressure to the visco foam topper. While a memory mattress is held up by a highly resillient core, the topper is held up by air, springs or whatever else the bed is made of. Extra weight also makes the open cells crumble quicker than they would under the average person.

You can expect a viscoelastic foam topper to wear out in 18-36 months.

If Only All Memory Toppers Were Made Of Tempur-Pedic Quality Foam.

Most viscoelastic toppers, however, are not usually made of the same quality grade material as beds and mattresses are. This means they don’t last as long. Viscoelastic material is very expensive to make and usually used to make only beds and mattresses.

Toppers, however, are generally much cheaper and using Tempur-style foam of the highest quality would make it economically unrealistic for manufacturers. Tempur Pedic brand mattress overlays, however,are made of the same NASA-evolved foam technology as Tempur mattresses. There is little information to indicate whether or not other mattress companies use the same grade foam in their toppers.

Bottom line, a visco memory foam bed topper will continue to provide support and comfort without sagging for 1.5-3 years, as long as it’s:

  • Made of high density Tempur-style memory foam
  • Used over a solid foundation
  • Reasonably thick.

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A Critical Eye On The Latest Mattress Technologies

How Long Does It Last?

What affects the expected lifetime of memory mattress pads and does a Tempurpedic overlay last longer? The answer is years and years as long as it’s made of better quality, higher-density foam.

Real NASA Link

Many manufacturers claim Swedish foam was first used by the NASA Space Program to boost sales for their visco foam beds.

NASA never did use that basic material in the 1960s. NASA bedding or space bedding technology simply does not exist as such.

The truth is the Swedish Tempur-Pedic company did eventually come up with a reliable formula now used in the best-selling Tempur mattress.

While Tempurpedic beds are commonly known to use Swedish foam bed technology, not all such products made in Sweden are made of the so-called NASA bed foam.

Authenticity Test

How can you check if your purchase as good as a authentic Tempur bed? You can try the wine glass test, the egg test, or the fridge test.

Here’s how often you should replace everything in your bedroom

As we head into spring cleaning season we suddenly remember all those things that should probably be washed. How long since those curtains have seen the inside of a washing machine, anyway? It’s also a good time of year to take stock and think about replacing things, like say that mattress you’ve had since the Clinton administration.

In honor of Valentine’s Day, why not take a spin around your bedroom and see what might need freshening up?

Mattress

When to Toss It: 10 years

Let’s start with the bed. Do you even remember how long you’ve had your mattress? If it’s more than 10 years, according to Consumer Reports, it probably time to go shopping. Depending on the type of bed, says all-things-sleep review site Sleep Like the Dead, it could be even less time; their research shows latex mattresses last around eight years, memory foam around seven, and inner spring even less.

Consumer Reports has more bad news. If you’re over 40 you can expect even less time out of a bed, since “your body tolerates less pressure as it ages,” they say.

How do you know when it’s time for out with the old and in with the new? Just listen to your body. If it’s “generally uncomfortable, or you’ve been waking up with back pain, it may be time for a new one,” says the National Sleep Foundation. (Or maybe you could just try these wake-up stretches!)

Pillows

When to Toss Them: 1 to 2 years

And how about where you lay your weary head? The National Sleep Foundation tells us to plan on replacing pillows every year or two. Why so often? Apparently they “absorb body oil, dead skin cells, and hair,” which can “create the perfect environment for dust mites (common allergens).” They also recommend washing your pillows every six months and using a protective case between the pillow and pillowcase. How do you know when it’s time for a new pillow? “Fold it in half and see if it stays that way,” they say. “If it does, it’s time for a new one.” If you spring for a quality down pillow and take good care of it, lifestyle guru Martha Stewart says you can get 10 or 15 years out of them.

If you’re over 40 you can expect even less time out of a bed, since your body tolerates less pressure as it ages.

7 Signs You Should Replace Your Mattress

A good night’s rest is crucial to your health and well-being, yet millions of Americans suffer from lack of sleep. TheSleep in Americastudy by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) found that 75% of adults have problems sleeping well. The study showed that 60% of respondents experienced daytime sleepiness that interfered with activities, caused work absences, or mistakes on the job. While medical conditions may be responsible for some instances of bad sleep, it might be your mattress that’s the issue. Review these seven signs that it’s time to replace your mattress to see if your bed is to blame for inadequate sleep.

#1 Your mattress is 7-10 years old

Research has found that mattresses have a life-span of roughly eight years, but this varies by manufacturer, mattress type, whether you sleep alone or with a partner, and how you sleep. If you’re a larger person, your mattress will likely wear out faster than manufacturer guidelines suggest.

Mattresses were not designed to last forever, and excessive wear and tear will age a product faster. Inferior products don’t last as long, yet even the highest-quality mattress has a maximum lifespan and will eventually need replacing. If your mattress is old, that’s the first sign you may need a new one.

#2 The mattress is saggy

If there’s a dent in your mattress in the shape of your body, that’s a signal that your mattress is overly worn. Sagging can occur with almost any mattress material (aside from waterbeds) and can be observed under your sleep area, at the edges, or both. If your mattress has springs, they can break down and sag.

Fiber, foam, and pillowtop materials all break down over time and the deeper the sag in your mattress, the more discomfort you’ll likely experience. Saggy mattresses can disrupt sleep and cause aches and pains. If your memory foam mattress core has softened, you may feel the sag as a “hammock” effect.

#3 Your spine isn’t aligned when you sleep

No matter how old (or new) your mattress, if it doesn’t offer proper support and alignment, you won’t get optimal sleep. For back or stomach sleepers, your spine’s natural S curve should be evident when you’re lying on your mattress. If it’s flattened or exaggerated, the mattress isn’t aligning your spine properly.

For side sleepers, your spine should be straight from neck to bottom if you’ve got proper support. A yardstick or level can confirm adequate alignment. A good pillow may correct minor issues, but if you can slide a hand in the gap between body and mattress, it’s a red flag that you might need a different mattress.

#4 Your mattress is uncomfortable

Knowing whether your mattress is comfortable sounds like common sense, but many people adjust to discomfort. If you get better sleep on a hotel mattress or a friend’s guest room, your home bed might not be comfortable enough. A bed may seem comfortable in a showroom but then doesn’t perform well at home.

The upper part of your mattress consists of “comfort layers” that should support your body and provide pressure relief. Comfort layers break down over time resulting in poor sleep and body aches but in some cases, your mattress choice might have been faulty from the start, and you need to replace it.

#5 You wake stiff and sore

Poor sleep can contribute to chronic back pain. If you wake up stiff and sore every day, your mattress could be part of the problem. If your back pain is worse when you wake but subsides when you stretch and move around, that’s a sign that the mattress is causing or contributing to your pain.

A firm mattress may not be the answer. A study from the Kovacs Foundation in Mallorca found that medium-firm mattresses provided better comfort for chronic low-back pain. Experts recommend sleep testing different types of mattresses before buying if you suffer pain while sleeping or when waking.

#6 Worsening allergies or asthma

If it’s not allergy season and there’s no alternate explanation for an uptick in allergy or asthma symptoms, your mattress might be the culprit.Slateinterviewed an expert on dust mites that said your mattress is a “crime scene in terms of how it gets inoculated with [dust] mites” over time.

The protein in dust mite feces may cause allergic reactions and asthma attacks and so can the dust that accumulates in your mattress. Vacuuming, steaming, and flipping your mattress might reduce dust and mites to ease your symptoms. If these steps don’t help, a new mattress might be the solution.

#7 You gained or lost weight (or added a co-sleeper)

For those that experience a significant gain or loss in weight over the life cycle of your mattress, the change might alter the effectiveness of your mattress. A Canadian study linked both inadequate and excessive sleep to weight gain so how you sleep and what you weigh are intermingled.

Heavier body types trigger more wear and tear on springs, foam, cushioning and mattress components. Also, if you were a solo sleeper but now have a partner in your bed, your mattress might not offer adequate sleep surface or support for the extra weight. That means it’s time for a new mattress.

Become an informed consumer

If you suspect you need a new mattress, do your homework, and educate yourself before you buy. Understand the lingo and gimmicks employed by mattress firms so that you get the product you need that fits your budget and gives you the best night’s sleep. There’s no prescription for which mattress will best fit your unique needs.

Look for a mattress that offers adequate support for spinal alignment. Comfort is subjective – it’s how a bed feels to you. You might find a firmer mattress superior to a softer one or vice-versa. Mattress selection is highly personal and should be your preference at the cross-section of proper alignment, support, and comfort.

How Long Do Mattresses Last?

Mattresses aren’t exactly cheap, most people replace them very infrequently and consider buying a new one either a chore or a burden. It’s easy to delay or prolong this process simply by taking proper care of whichever type you own. As a general rule, most should be replaced within ten years for best results in sleep and health, however, the average life of a mattress can last beyond ten years or more if taken care of properly. While it is true that how long one lasts depends on different factors, you can easily increase its life expectancy by undertaking a small number of simple steps. Here is a look at a few of the factors that can decide how long should a mattress last, and possible ways to increase its lifespan:

Table of Contents

1. The Type

What type do you have? For instance, is it air, innerspring, memory foam or latex? Each one has its own life expectancy; air and innerspring being the shortest, memory foam being mid length, while latex types are known to last the longest.

  • Air mattresses will over time either develop leaks or generally become less effective at retaining air pressure. If they have a built-in pump that becomes faulty, this too can lead to premature replacement. Overall, the average air mattress life expectancy is placed at five years.
  • Spring mattresses are good for sharing couples who like a springy and bouncy surface, but unfortunately, due to the inner core being thin metal wire, this type does tend to sag and lose its support even if flipped and rotated regularly. Even ones which have been well cared for will most likely need replacing within 7-8 years.
  • Memory foam mattresses are less prone to sagging but not invincible. They too require rotating, and foam does eventually lose its support but after a long while. This type should be good for at least ten years if kept ventilated, clean, and rotated.
  • Latex mattresses are the creme de la creme and tick all the boxes for quality and longevity. The naturally hypoallergenic and anti-microbial properties add to the durable nature of latex rubber foam to combine a core which can last up to 15 years.

2. Regular Cleaning

Another important factor which determines mattress life expectancy is to do with cleaning.Howdo you clean it? Do you clean itregularly? Do you give it to aprofessionalcleaner? It’s essential that you clean your mattress regularly to prolong the life. If you do not, it won’t last long at all. This is due to the invisible bacteria, mildew, and mattress mold that can slowly eat away at the materials involved. Moreover, it may be better if you could have it cleaned professionally from time to time, as mattresses are home to bacteria and germs in plenty, which might not get adequately cleansed with household cleaning products and methods.

3. Amount of Use

As you can imagine, anything that is used more will last less. However, there are two things that need to be kept in mind. Whichever type you own, it wouldn’t last as long in cases of extreme use, for example sharing couples who use for 10+ hours per day, and secondly on the other hand, if it has been left unused and uncleaned for prolong periods of time. Mattresses that are moderately used, where people sleep on it for around 7-8 hours a day, and then cleaned regularly are the ones that have the longest life.

4. The Cleaning Products

The question of how long do mattresses last really is to do with many supporting factors, but quite often depends on the cleaning methods used to clean them. For instance, in case of blood stains, you might have to use hydrogen peroxide to get rid. Too much of this chemical (and other heavy duty stain removers) would lead to a reduction of mattress life as these are not made to withstand such chemical uses.

5. Proper Precautions

It is always nice to have kids around the house. However, if your kids want to use your bed as a trampoline, it seriously isn’t a good idea. You would rather have them play elsewhere since this can seriously damage your bed. Imagine you have an innerspring, the springs will become too soft and compressed in no time at all and will leave you with a creaky and sagging surface. Additionally, whether it’s latex or memory foam, soon there will be indentations which are beyond repair. To prolong its life, you can also rotate and flip it from time to time, but that’s only if it’s double-sided and permits you to do so. You could perform this every few months for the duration of its life, which will significantly improve how long a mattress can last.

When Do You Know You Cannot Use Your Mattress?

Usually, mattresses that are over seven years old do not provide the comfort and support you need on the bed. Once you see there are signs of the surface and support wearing out, or you’re feeling uncomfortable in the bed when you are sleeping on it, you would be better off changing it. Some of the common visible signs of wearing are sagging, holes and tearing. If you cannot get a full night’s sleep and feel that you’re having a better slumber elsewhere than your bed, you need to start looking for a replacement.

You might buy the most expensive mattress, but if you do not care for it properly, it might not even last ten years. On the other side, ones which are taken care of correctly are known to last more than 15 years.

How Long do Mattress Toppers Last?

Do you wake up in pain? Are you thinking its the old mattress topper you have on your bed? Did you know mattress toppers are only expected to last 3 to 5 years?

Yes, 3 to 5 years is the lifespan of a good mattress topper. Not this 10 years I keep hearing about. (cheap and crappy toppers will only last a year or two.)

Let me explain reasons why and when you should replace your mattress toppers.

Table of Contents

When to Replace You Mattress Topper?

You should replace your mattress topper every 3 to 5 years, or if it’s causing pain, or if you get a new mattress.

This whole idea of a mattress topper or even mattress pad lasting for 10 years is just crazy. Especially when mattresses are only lasting 5 to 7 years before you need a new one.

If you do get a new mattress, then you need a new topper as the old topper is worn into the style of the old mattress and will feel odd on your new bed.

What Toppers Last The Longest?

The toppers that usually last the longest are also the ones that cost the most. The old saying of “you get what you pay for” plays very true for mattress toppers.

Some of the best mattress toppers I have ever used were made with wool. Wool is a fantastic product for regulating body heat and sleeping very comfortably. Here is a Wool Mattress Topper/Pad that I like using myself.

Memory Foam Mattress Topper

Many people will go with a memory foam mattress topper which will work fine for most. Usually, the thicker the topper, the longer it will last. The thickness also plays a role in the comfort, the thicker ones being softer.

The reason why the thicker memory foam mattress toppers last longer as they take longer for the foam to break down over time. So a 1.5-inch topper will need to be replaced sooner than a 4-inch topper.

Latex Mattress Topper

Latex mattress toppers are one of the nicer toppers you can buy and offer one of the best supports too. Like wool toppers, they can be more expensive than a memory foam topper but they do last longer in my experience.

I’ve always had the best luck with latex toppers over memory foam when it comes to lifespan and comfort, but sometimes the price of memory foam keeps people going back to it.

If you have the money I would look into latex, it is not that much more and is light years better if you ask me.

Lifespan Overall

No matter what you get, don’t expect a mattress topper to last over 10 years. That is not rational to expect out of a topper.

Only expect 3 to 5 years out of a mattress topper. Replace your mattress topper when you get a new mattress because the old topper has shaped to the old mattress and will feel odd on your new one.

I’ve seen some mattress toppers only last 18 months, but those were you really think and cheap ones you get at the department stores. I wouldavoid department storesthat sell mattress toppers as they’re the worst.

And replace your topper if you have pains, you might want to try a different topper if the current one is giving issues. If you have hip or joint pains, you ought to consider a thick wool topper or thick memory foam topper.

If you have pains and you have a new mattress topper, then it might be your mattress that is the issue. If your mattress is over 7 years old then its time for a new one. The reason why mattress and toppers only last so long is because people can spend 6 to 8 hours a night on them and that’s a lot of pressure on one object for a long time. Combine that over the years of doing that, and anything will wear out.

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