How Long Should A Queen Size Mattress Last

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How long does a mattress last?

My mattress is getting on in years. In fact, Bill Clinton was in his first term as president when I last bought a new one. Is it time for me to replace my mattress?

You’ve probably logged more than 30,000 hours in your bed, and your mattress has likely become less comfortable and less supportive. But there’s no set formula for determining when you need to replace a mattress. It might be time to buy one if:
•You regularly wake up tired or achy—you make Oscar the Grouch seem as cheerful as Mr. Rogers.
•You tend to sleep better away from home, than in your own bed. Are you planning unnecessary business trips or looking for any reason to go on a weekend getaway?
•Your mattress looks or feels saggy or lumpy—it needs go on the Abs Diet.
•You’re over age 40 and your mattress is five to seven years old. Remember, your body tolerates less pressure as it ages. As if getting older weren’t tough enough . . .

A mattress can be an expensive investment—we’ve tested models that cost in excess of $4,000—but if you treat your new one properly, it could easily last 10 years. Our advice:
•Don’t let your kids use your bed as a trampoline.
•Rotate your mattress. If you have a single-sided mattress (you sleep on only one side), rotate the mattress from end to end—that is, move the mattress 180 degrees. The foot of the mattress is now at the head, and vice versa.
If you have a double-sided mattress, rotate it as above, then turn it over so the bottom is now on top.
Perform these steps every two weeks for the first three months you have your new mattress, then once every two months thereafter. You’ll find illustrated instructions on a number of different Web sites.
• Use a bed frame that has a center support.

Essential information:See “How to buy a mattress without losing sleep” for detailed advice on finding the perfect bed. And watch our video buying guide.

How Long Do Mattresses Last?

Mattresses aren’t exactly cheap, most people replace them very infrequently and consider buying a new one either a chore or a burden. It’s easy to delay or prolong this process simply by taking proper care of whichever type you own. As a general rule, most should be replaced within ten years for best results in sleep and health, however, the average life of a mattress can last beyond ten years or more if taken care of properly. While it is true that how long one lasts depends on different factors, you can easily increase its life expectancy by undertaking a small number of simple steps. Here is a look at a few of the factors that can decide how long should a mattress last, and possible ways to increase its lifespan:

Table of Contents

1. The Type

What type do you have? For instance, is it air, innerspring, memory foam or latex? Each one has its own life expectancy; air and innerspring being the shortest, memory foam being mid length, while latex types are known to last the longest.

  • Air mattresses will over time either develop leaks or generally become less effective at retaining air pressure. If they have a built-in pump that becomes faulty, this too can lead to premature replacement. Overall, the average air mattress life expectancy is placed at five years.
  • Spring mattresses are good for sharing couples who like a springy and bouncy surface, but unfortunately, due to the inner core being thin metal wire, this type does tend to sag and lose its support even if flipped and rotated regularly. Even ones which have been well cared for will most likely need replacing within 7-8 years.
  • Memory foam mattresses are less prone to sagging but not invincible. They too require rotating, and foam does eventually lose its support but after a long while. This type should be good for at least ten years if kept ventilated, clean, and rotated.
  • Latex mattresses are the creme de la creme and tick all the boxes for quality and longevity. The naturally hypoallergenic and anti-microbial properties add to the durable nature of latex rubber foam to combine a core which can last up to 15 years.

2. Regular Cleaning

Another important factor which determines mattress life expectancy is to do with cleaning.Howdo you clean it? Do you clean itregularly? Do you give it to aprofessionalcleaner? It’s essential that you clean your mattress regularly to prolong the life. If you do not, it won’t last long at all. This is due to the invisible bacteria, mildew, and mattress mold that can slowly eat away at the materials involved. Moreover, it may be better if you could have it cleaned professionally from time to time, as mattresses are home to bacteria and germs in plenty, which might not get adequately cleansed with household cleaning products and methods.

3. Amount of Use

As you can imagine, anything that is used more will last less. However, there are two things that need to be kept in mind. Whichever type you own, it wouldn’t last as long in cases of extreme use, for example sharing couples who use for 10+ hours per day, and secondly on the other hand, if it has been left unused and uncleaned for prolong periods of time. Mattresses that are moderately used, where people sleep on it for around 7-8 hours a day, and then cleaned regularly are the ones that have the longest life.

4. The Cleaning Products

The question of how long do mattresses last really is to do with many supporting factors, but quite often depends on the cleaning methods used to clean them. For instance, in case of blood stains, you might have to use hydrogen peroxide to get rid. Too much of this chemical (and other heavy duty stain removers) would lead to a reduction of mattress life as these are not made to withstand such chemical uses.

5. Proper Precautions

It is always nice to have kids around the house. However, if your kids want to use your bed as a trampoline, it seriously isn’t a good idea. You would rather have them play elsewhere since this can seriously damage your bed. Imagine you have an innerspring, the springs will become too soft and compressed in no time at all and will leave you with a creaky and sagging surface. Additionally, whether it’s latex or memory foam, soon there will be indentations which are beyond repair. To prolong its life, you can also rotate and flip it from time to time, but that’s only if it’s double-sided and permits you to do so. You could perform this every few months for the duration of its life, which will significantly improve how long a mattress can last.

When Do You Know You Cannot Use Your Mattress?

Usually, mattresses that are over seven years old do not provide the comfort and support you need on the bed. Once you see there are signs of the surface and support wearing out, or you’re feeling uncomfortable in the bed when you are sleeping on it, you would be better off changing it. Some of the common visible signs of wearing are sagging, holes and tearing. If you cannot get a full night’s sleep and feel that you’re having a better slumber elsewhere than your bed, you need to start looking for a replacement.

You might buy the most expensive mattress, but if you do not care for it properly, it might not even last ten years. On the other side, ones which are taken care of correctly are known to last more than 15 years.

The Ins and Outs of Memory Foam: Is It Worth the Hype?

April 10, 2017
Filed under: Shopping Tips

Memory foam mattresses have soared in popularity over the last decade. Memory foam pillows are a more recent addition to the product line. But what’s so great about memory foam? A lot, it turns out.

What is memory foam?

Memory foam material dates back to 1966 when it was developed by NASA to absorb shock in airplane seats. Since then, “slow spring back foam” (as it was initially referred to) has been used in NFL helmets, hospital beds, shoes, and prosthetics.

Memory foam has evolved in recent years, and technologically advanced foams are common materials in mattress construction. For example, Serta’s gel foam mattresses are made up of a combination of tiny cushioning chambers, each infused with millions of Titanium gel beads uniquely designed to relieve pressure points, provide added support and aid in temperature regulation.

Why do some sleepers prefer memory foam?

Memory foam is a great mattress material for many reasons. It evenly distributes weight and pressure over an area, giving many sleepers pressure point relief. The foam contours to each individual’s body shape, allowing for a high level of mattress personalization. Memory foam is also resistant to movement. If your bed partner gets up frequently or tosses and turns at night, the activity doesn’t ripple throughout the entire mattress.

Now, advanced memory foam technology helps keep you cool while you sleep. Serta’s iComfort mattress collection, for example, features EverFeel® Triple Effects™ Gel Memory Foam which provides a cool and comfortable night’s sleep.

How long does memory foam last?

Memory foam mattresses can last anywhere from eight to ten years, depending on how well they’re cared for. Typically, a memory foam mattress will last as long as any other type of mattress, whether it’s an innerspring or hybrid.

A liquid resistant mattress protector is a good way to keep your memory foam mattress clean and free from stains, which can impact the warranty. Our iComfort TempActiv mattress protector is a great choice for your memory foam mattress due to its cool-to-the-touch feel and water proof barrier.

What if I’m still not sure?

That’s okay! A new mattress is a big decision. If you prefer the traditional feel of an innerspring mattress, Serta offers the best of both worlds. Our hybrid mattresses mattress models combine gel memory foam with the most advanced individually wrapped steel coil innerspring systems. No matter your comfort preference, we’ve got you covered.

How Long Do Mattresses Last? The Results May Shock You!

Mattresses are pretty expensive — one quick glance at our buyer’s guide will confirm this fact. This is why many people do not replace them – not even after many years of use.

They do not want to spend a lot of money on a new one. Besides, now you can delay the process of buying a new one if you do an excellent job at maintaining your existing one.So, how often should you replace your mattress?

It doesn’t matter which type of bed you have. Most of them are ready for replacement within ten years to ensure a good night’s rest (old mattresses can hurt your sleep quality). Besides, it can last beyond ten years on average, if the owners maintain it properly.

Also, many different factors affect a bed’s lifespan. You can extend its life expectancy by following a few easy steps in the text below. We prepared and wrote down some tips to boost its longevity.

A good mattress can go a long way to ensuring you get a good night’s sleep.

Finding a mattress you find comfortable and suits your budget can be tricky.

Five minutes of feeling things out on a bustling show floor won’t help you figure out which brands and models are comfortable and long lasting.

We can help you work out what type and size of mattress is best for you, and even how to save 50% or more on your next purchase.

Looking for mattresses?

We’ve tested to find you the best.

How to choose a comfortable mattress

Comfort is subjective, but understanding mattress firmness and the differences in mattress type will help you narrow the field when it comes to testing a mattress instore.

How firm should my mattress be?

It all comes down to your preferred sleeping position:

  • Firm: If you sleep on your stomach, a firm mattress will keep your spine aligned.
  • Medium: If you sleep on your back, it’ll provide support for your spine, back and neck while keeping you comfortable.
  • Soft: Great for sleeping on your side because it’ll support and contour your body’s curves.

But be warned: we’ve found that most retailers’ firmness claims don’t match the bed being sold. We do body support and stability tests when we test mattresses, so check out our mattress reviews to see what we found.

If you’re a side sleeper, a soft mattress will support your body’s curves.

What type of mattress is best?

It really depends on your personal preference. For example, you may find a spring mattress supports your spine while a foam finish feels a bit too solid.

We explain the pros and cons, and price range, for the different types of mattresses.

There are two types of coil mattresses:

  • Continuous coil mattresses are made from a single piece of wire looped into springs.
  • Open-coil mattresses are made of single springs fixed together by one wire.
Price
  • $400 to $10,000*
  • They’re usually lighter than other options.
  • Typically cheaper.
  • Can wear out quickly.
  • Because the springs move as one unit the mattress is less responsive to your body.
  • Any tossing and turning is likely to disturb a partner.
  • Springs can rust.

* Typical retail for a queen-sized mattress.

Topped with a layer of temperature-sensitive viscoelastic material, aka memory foam.

Price

Pros

  • Absorbs your weight as you sink in, taking pressure off your joints and increasing circulation.
  • Can mould to the shape of your body.
  • No risk of rust (if foam only).

Cons

  • Can make you feel "encased".
  • Can feel too solid and dense (not springy). Not likely to please someone wanting a softer, more cushioned night’s sleep.
  • Can get warm easily due to limited air circulation.
  • Can be cumbersome to move due to their weight and heft.

* Typical retail for a queen-sized mattress.

A blend of natural and synthetic latex that moulds to body shape.

Price

Pros

  • Durable and breathable.
  • Better for people with allergies.
  • Doesn’t gather dust mites.

Cons

  • Has a solid feel, so they’re not likely to please someone wanting a softer, more cushioned night’s sleep.
  • Can be cumbersome to move due to their weight and heft.
  • Cheaper versions can get lumpy after a time.

* Typical retail for a queen-sized mattress.

Has up to 3000 springs sewn into individual fabric pockets.

Price

Pros

  • Good air circulation.
  • Firmness can be set by tweaking spring tension (by manufacturer).
  • Good support by distributing your body weight evenly.
  • Can support two people of two different body weights well because the springs are separate.

Cons

  • Can be heavy to turn, as they’re filled with natural materials, such as lambswool.
  • Natural materials can exacerbate allergies.
  • Springs can rust.

* Typical retail for a queen-sized mattress.

These combine elements of memory foam and spring mattresses. They have the same pros and cons.

What size mattress do I need?

Retailers and manufacturers recommend buying the largest bed your room can accommodate, and the length of the mattress should be at least 10–15 centimetres longer than the tallest person sleeping on it.

SizeMeasurements (W x L)
Single92 x 187cm
Single extra long92 x 203cm
King single106 x 203cm
Double137 x 187cm
Queen153 x 203cm
King183 x 203cm

How to test a mattress instore

  • Take your time: Most people need seven to nine hours sleep a night. A couple of minutes on your back won’t come close to replicating this experience. Lie down for as long as you need – though you probably shouldn’t spend the night.
  • Move about: Roll over, sit up, get in and out of the bed. Ease of movement contributes to comfort. It will take more effort if the mattress is too soft, and will feel uncomfortable on your hips and shoulders if it’s too firm.
  • Sleep on slats (or a base): Make sure the bed base in the shop is similar to the one you have at home. If you have fixed slats or a hard surface, a soft mattress will feel very different on top of that, rather than the ensemble base it’s resting on in the shop.
  • Bring your partner: If you share a bed with someone regularly or every night, bring them along and ask them to lie in the bed and move around. Be aware of how the bed moves on your side when your partner moves.
  • Don’t shop tired: All the mattresses will feel great if you’re already sleepy!
  • Ask the salesperson to leave: While they may be friendly and helpful, few of us are able to really relax when someone is hovering around.
  • Ask questions about the display model: The mattress you test in store could have been on display for two days, two weeks or even two months, with hundreds of customers potentially trying them out over that period. This will affect sag, firmness, support and so on.
  • Ask if there’s a comfort guarantee:Most manufacturers don’t offer a guarantee on comfort, so you probably can’t return it if it doesn’t feel right. That said, there are a few brands that do, so it always pays to ask. Jump to Can I return a mattress? for more info.

Take your time when buying a mattress in store, and don’t be afraid to ask the salesperson to leave you to it.

How to get the best deal on a mattress

Retailers leave a significant amount of wiggle room in the price. In fact, you’re getting ripped off if you settle for RRP.

We shaved at least half and even two-thirds off the asking price while shopping for most of the mattresses in our recent tests by using the following tricks:

  • Wait for a sale: They take place regularly and can bring the price down by as much as 50%.
  • Head in store: Deals are generally better instore than online.
  • Haggle: We rarely encountered a salesperson who wasn’t willing to shave a few hundred dollars off the asking price, even during a sale.
  • Buy in bulk: Our discounts improved when we bought at least two beds at once, which may be handy if you’re refurnishing a house.
  • Consider exclusive ranges: Retailers such as Snooze, Forty Winks and Fantastic stock exclusive brands. We found that salespeople are much more inclined to sell these over third-party brands. Snooze, for example, offered us a much better discount on their exclusive Madison range when we expressed interest in buying a Sealy.

Retailers leave a significant amount of wiggle room in the price. In fact, you’re getting ripped off if you settle for RRP.

How to haggle

Haggling can be tricky, particularly if you’re not overly confident. But you don’t need to be a smooth-talking, wheeling and dealing sort to take advantage of potential savings.

After a little back-and-forward with salespeople, we asked this question:

  • "What’s the best you can do?"

That’s it – or some sort of variant.

Remember, you’re there to buy, they’re there to sell. You’re not establishing a lifelong friendship, and they’re not going to throw you out for asking.

Mattress mark-ups are so high, you don’t need to do much when it comes to saving money, which is why this question works.

Should I buy a mattress in store or online?

Bed in a box is an online only mattress industry. Manufacturers cut out the middleman by selling directly to the consumer, and they deliver compressed mattresses to your door in a box, hence the name. Once opened, the mattresses slowly expand into the full size (single, double, queen etc).

  • As well as being a cheaper, and much more convenient, almost all brands let you assess the mattress after purchasing.
  • If you don’t like it, you can return it for a refund, making the purchase more or less risk free.

However, this does not mean online shopping is always the best option.

Buying your mattress instore

  • Can try before you buy.
  • Opportunity to haggle.
  • Lots of options from multiple brands in one place.
  • Point of return if faulty.
  • Many types available.
  • Generally no trial period (some exceptions such as Forty Winks).
  • Can’t change your mind once it’s used.
  • Shady sales practices (e.g. tested firmness doesn’t match advertised firmness).
  • Sales situations can be high pressure.
  • Need to take it home or pay extra for delivery.

Buying your mattress online

  • Delivered to your door.
  • Cheaper.
  • Trial period (e.g. Koala allows 120 days, no questions asked returns).
  • Can change your mind.
  • No pressure to buy.
  • Sold at set price. No ability to haggle.
  • You need to buy the mattress before trying it.
  • Forced to trust manufacturer claims regarding firmness, comfort etc.
  • Can be harder to return (than a traditional retailer).
  • Mostly limited to foam mattresses (small number of spring mattresses available)

Trial period

Bed in a box brands however, offer home trial periods that range from 30, to more than 100 nights. If you’re unhappy with your purchase, you can exchange the mattress for a different model (if available), or a full refund.

  • It takes a few nights, minimum, to adjust to a new mattress.
  • You aren’t forced to speculate and make a snap decision that you may later regret.
  • You may come to like a bed that initially felt uncomfortable. This is another reason why our out of the box comfort results are not the defining scores in our test.
  • It significantly reduces the financial risks involved.

See our mattress reviews to find out how long the different retailers give you to try the mattress at home and still return it.

Can I return a mattress?

Making a warranty claim on your mattress

This can be tricky, because arguments regarding comfort, faults and so on can be considered subjective, or part of ‘normal wear and tear’.

And while most mattresses have a 10-year warranty period, the small print is often overflowing with restrictions and conditions.

Take SleepMaker for example. While their warranty covers manufacturing faults, theywon’t protect against:

  • a reasonable level of dipping (25–35mm)
  • comfort concern as a result of product selection
  • heat issues.

These are just some of the terms, but they illustrate the grey areas consumers can find themselves in.

As our investigation into spring mattresses found, advertised and tested firmness rarely match up, and it’s likely that your purchase may not be as comfortable as you expect.

However, this wouldn’t fall under a warranty claim in SleepMaker’s case. These terms aren’t exclusive to SleepMaker. In fact, they’re one of the more upfront brands when it comes to outlining their claims procedure.

Most mattresses have a 10-year warranty period, but the small print is often overflowing with restrictions and conditions

Returning your mattress (traditional retailer)

The onus largely falls on you, the buyer, to make the right purchase if you’re buying from a retailer, even when the industry practices are questionable.

Because mattresses are used in the same manner as clothes, headphones etc., getting a refund under general consumer protections can be difficult.

These generally cover unfit for purpose, which isunlikely to include:

  • comfort
  • size (mattress not fitting your base)
  • reasonable sagging after extensive use
  • damage due to misuse or mishandling
  • smell and general wear and tear (i.e. stains).

If you truly feel that you’ve been sold a faulty product, be persistent. You can make a return.

One of the mattresses we bought from our test arrived with rust around the frame. This is reasonable grounds for a return.

Returning your mattress (bed in a box)

Almost all bed in a box brands offer a free trial period. You can return the mattress for a refund within this time, if you don’t like it. Returned beds are typically donated to charity.

However, you must adhere to these general terms to be eligible:

  • Duration: Make sure you apply for a refund/return within the allocated period.
  • Minimum use period: Brands also specify a minimum usage period before you’re eligible for a return, so you can take time to properly assess the mattress.
  • Damage: You won’t be able to return a mattress if it’s damaged, sunk, stained, torn etc. It’s worth treating your mattress like fine china, keeping it well away from food, drink and so on, and making sure you’re clean as a whistle when it’s time for bed.
  • Protection: Almost all brands specify that you must use a mattress protector during the free trial period.

Check the "free trial" page on the company’s website to find the specific terms

The so-called free trial period may incur a return fee depending on where you live, and how the manufacturer handles returns.

  • Metro areas:major cities and urban centres are eligible for free returns in almost all cases.
  • Rural and regional areas: about half of the brands we looked at charge a pickup fee outside metro locations.
  • Service dependent: companies will either send their own crew, a courier, or a representative from their charity they’ve partnered with to collect the mattress. You may have to organise your own courier if the brand can’t make it to your location, which will result in additional costs. This is usually determined during the return process.
  • Occasionally, you’ll encounter brands that charge an exchange fee, on top of the pickup costs.

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