How Long Should A Latex Mattress Last

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How Long Should a Mattress Last?

Quick Overview

The average mattress – regardless of firmness, thickness, or material composition – will perform for approximately seven years before a replacement is needed. However, a wide range of factors can affect the expected lifespan of an individual mattress model, making some much more durable than others.

This guide will look at how lifespans vary by mattress type, and also discuss ways to determine a bed’s longevity based on different variables.

Mattress Durability and Lifespan

When evaluating the longevity of a specific mattress, two key terms are ‘durability’ and ‘lifespan.’

  • Durabilityrefers to how well the bed withstands sagging, sinkage, and other forms of deterioration that can compromise comfort and support for sleepers. All mattresses eventually deteriorate, but some are much more durable and less susceptible to wear and tear.
  • Thelifespanis how long a mattress performs before it needs to be replaced. A mattress may deteriorate to some degree and still perform reasonably well, but if its comfort and/or support materials no longer function as intended then the bed is most likely due for a replacement.

Because durability and lifespan are technically different terms, they may not necessarily be linked. A mattress made from durable materials may not have a very long lifespan due to the way it is designed or configured.

Likewise, a mattress with less durable materials may have a reasonable lifespan if it is constructed in a way that promotes longevity. However, in most cases, durability and lifespan are directly correlated.

How Do Mattresses Deteriorate?

Mattress deterioration, otherwise known as wear and tear, comes in several forms. These include:

Sagging:Sagging normally occurs along the surface of the bed in areas that support the heaviest parts of the sleeper’s body, such as the shoulders/chest and hips. Excessive sagging causes the surface to become uneven. This can lead to aches and pains for sleepers. Sagging is particularly common with couples, since the bodies of both sleepers are usually aligned.

Body Impressions:Body impressions are a common issue with mattresses featuring foam and/or latex comfort layers and support cores. Over time, the surface will develop a semi-permanent imprint of the sleeper’s body. This may limit the sleeper to one position, since switching to a new position can cause the surface to feel uneven.

Softening:All mattresses soften to some extent after regular, nightly use. Normal softening will not affect the bed’s comfort levels or pressure-relieving abilities. Excessive softening, however, can cause the materials to sag and develop indentations more quickly. Softening is most noticeable on mattresses that feel ‘Medium Firm,’ ‘Firm,’ or ‘Extra Firm.’

Mechanical malfunctions:Mechanical malfunctions are an issue limited to airbeds, smart beds, and other mattresses with electrical components. These include issues with air pumps, manual and/or remote controls, and outlet connectivity.

Durability and Lifespan by Mattress Type

Material composition is usually the most telling factor when it comes to determining the durability and expected lifespan of a mattress. The vast majority of mattresses sold today fall into one of the following categories:

Innerspring

Most innersprings are constructed with foam-based comfort layers and steel, non-pocketed coils in the support core. These mattresses have the lowest projected lifespan among all mattress types because they are most susceptible to sagging – sometimes after only two to three years of use. The average innerspring has a lifespan ofsix to six and a half years.

For all-foam mattresses, longevity is often tied to foam density; low-density foams are considerably less durable than high-density, and even medium-density, foams.

Memory foam also has better longevity than polyfoam, but both materials will eventually develop prominent body indentations that restrict movement or position changes for sleepers. The average polyfoam/memory foam mattress has a lifespan ofsix and a half to seven years.

Latex

Natural latex – derived from the sap of rubber trees – is one of the most durable mattress materials available. Some latex mattresses use synthetic latex instead; this material is not as durable as natural latex, but tends to perform longer than mattress foams.

The chief issue with latex is softening, and some sleepers also report body indentations, but these issues normally do not affect the bed until after years of use. The average all-latex mattress has a lifespan ofseven and a half to eight years, with most natural latex beds outlasting mattresses with synthetic latex layers.

Hybrid

A hybrid, by definition, has memory foam and/or latex comfort layers and pocketed coils in the support core. Like innersprings, hybrids are particularly vulnerable to sagging and body impressions.

Hybrids may also soften rather quickly, depending on how thick the comfort layers are and which materials are used. The average hybrid has a lifespan ofsix and a half to seven years, with latex hybrids typically outlasting memory foam hybrids.

Airbed

Airbeds, when properly maintained, have longer-than-average expected lifespans. Most are constructed from durable materials that withstand sagging, body impressions, and other forms of wear and tear. However, airbed are uniquely vulnerable to mechanical malfunctions.

If addressed, these malfunctions may not impact the lifespan too much. Airbeds may also sag and develop body impressions if they have thick comfort layers. The average airbed has a lifespan ofeight to nine years.

The table below breaks down durability and lifespan expectations for these five mattress types.

Mattress TypeInnerspringFoamLatexHybridAirbed
Average lifespan6 to 6.5 years6.5 to 7 years7.5 to 8 years6.5 to 7 years8 to 9 years
Overall durabilityPoor to FairFair to GoodGood to Very GoodFair to GoodGood to Very Good
Sagging potentialPoor to FairFairGoodFairFair to Good
Body impression potentialGoodPoor to FairFair to GoodFair to GoodGood
Premature softening potentialGoodPoor to FairFair to GoodFair to GoodGood
Mechanical malfunction potentialExcellentExcellentExcellentExcellentPoor to Fair
Overall longevity scoreFairGoodVery GoodGoodVery Good

Warranty Considerations

All mattresses come with a manufacturer’s warranty that protects the bed against early deterioration and ensures owners will not have to pay hefty fees if a defect develops. Most mattress warranty coverage period begin on the date of purchase or delivery, but will not fully kick in until the bed’s sleep trial has ended. The sleep trial – a period during which customers can test out the mattress and return it for a full/partial refund if they are not satisfied – typically lasts 90 to 120 nights, though some span one year or longer.

A standard mattress warranty covers the product for 10 years, but 15-, 20-, and 25-year – as well as lifetime – warranties are fairly common. The warranty length is not necessarily tied to the bed’s durability or expected lifespan. In fact, because most mattresses need to be replaced within six to nine years, a warranty exceeding 10 years in length will likely be unnecessary. This is important to keep in mind because lengthy warranties can drive up the mattress price by a significant margin.

Additional warranty details to consider include the following:

Sagging/body impression depth

Nearly all mattress warranties specify a sagging and impression depth that is considered a defect and warrants repair or replacement. Though this varies by model, the depth usually falls between half an inch (1/2″) and one and a half inches (1 1/2″).

One thing to note: sagging and impressions that measure one inch (1″) or less are not associated with as much sleeper discomfort as those that exceed one inch in depth. Therefore, mattress buyers may want to think twice about models with warranties that only recognize sagging and indentations that measure at least one and a half inches deep.

Covered defects

In addition to sagging and body impressions, a mattress warranty may also consider the following issues defects that warranty repairs or replacements:

  • Physical flaws in the bed that cause materials to split or crack
  • Manufacturing flaws associated with the cover, such as cracked/broken zippers or loose seams
  • Coils or wires that protrude through the bed’s surface and/or sidewalls

Most warranties do not consider the following issues to be defects that justify repairs or replacements:

  • Sagging or indentations that do not reach the prescribed depth
  • Repairs or replacement requests that occur due to changes in the owner’s firmness, thickness, or material composition preferences
  • Physical damage that occurs due to misuse or improper support. This includes, but is not limited to, burns, cuts, tears, stains, and liquid damage
  • Mold, mildew, bedbugs, and other types of infestation
Repairs and replacements

In most cases, a mattress warranty will guarantee that the manufacturer will replace or repair a defective mattress for at least 10 years. The brand will cover the repair/replacement costs. However, owners may face the following charges for these services:

  • Mattress shipping and transportation costs
  • Mattress inspection fees
  • Upgrade costs if the mattress is replaced with a more expensive model

Some warranties promise the manufacturer will repair or replace a defective mattress for a long as the warranty is valid; others offer a one-time repair or replacement. Always read the warranty’s fine-print carefully to minimize costs associated with repairs or replacements.

Nonprorated vs. prorated coverage

Customers should read the warranty carefully to see if it is entirely nonprorated or divided into nonprorated and prorated periods.

Duringnonproratedcoverage, the manufacturer will repair or replace a defective mattress at no additional charge to the owner apart from the costs listed in the previous box. Nearly all 10-year warranties are completely nonprorated; longer warranties usually include at least 10 years of nonprorated coverage, as well.

Duringproratedcoverage, owners must pay for mattress replacements – and in some cases, repairs too. Prorated charges vary by warranty. In most cases, they are calculated by multiplying a certain percentage of the original product price by the number of years of ownership.

For instance, let’s say a mattress comes with a 20-year warranty that includes 10 years of nonprorated coverage and 10 years of prorated coverage. Once prorated coverage kicks in, the owner must pay 5% of the original price multiplied by the number of years they have owned the mattress. This means that, in Year 11, they must pay 55% of the original mattress price for a replacement; in Year 12, they pay 60%; and so on until the 20th year, when the warranty expires. Some prorated warranties max out the prorated charges at 90% to 95%.

Prorated coverage is primarily used for warranties that span 15 years or longer. Most include at least 10 years of nonprorated coverage before the prorated charges begin, but some only feature two to three years of nonprorated coverage. Customers should carefully read the mattress warranty before purchasing in order to determine if the coverage guidelines meet their needs.

Transferability

All mattress warranties are non-transferable, making them exclusively available to original purchasers who buy their bed from the original manufacturer or an authorized retailer. Those who buy the bed from a non-authorized retailer – or buy/acquire it from the original owner – do not receive warranty coverage.

Should You Replace Your Current Mattress?

Based on the information above, you may decide it’s time to ditch your current mattress and buy a new one. Use the following checklist to determine if a replacement is necessary; more than one ‘yes’ response probably means it’s time for a new bed.

  • You and/or your sleep partner notice sagging in the sleep surface that compromises support to a noticeable extent
  • You and/or your sleep partner cannot move or shift positions in bed easily due to deep body impressions
  • Excessive softening in the sleep surface affects how supportive and comfortable the mattress feels
  • You and/or your sleep partner experience added aches and pains after sleeping that were not an issue before
  • You own a bed with mechanical components that seem to malfunction easily
  • Your bed’s warranty has reached a prorated period that will result in expensive charges if a replacement or repairs are warranted

Latex Mattress Reviews

For decades, latex was viewed as only a luxury mattress option, out of reach for most customers. In recent years, though, latex has become more affordable thanks to the increasing availability of online mattress retailers, and now, latex mattresses offer excellent performance and value while remaining within the budget of most mattress shoppers.

The majority of the latex used in today’s mattresses is high-quality, naturally sourced from rubber trees and produced using the Dunlop or Talalay manufacturing process. All-latex beds are made using only latex while latex hybrids employ other materials, such as foams or innerspring coils, as well.

Latex has a unique feel that blends contouring, resilience, and comfort. Latex mattresses are available in a compelling mix of designs and firmness options. Key selling points include their temperature regulation, natural bounciness, and conforming ability that offers relief from back and shoulder pain. They are also denser, heavier mattresses that can provide stability and above-average support for sleepers with a higher body weight.

As new latex beds have come on the market, customers have more choices than ever. In this guide, we’ll identify our top picks for the best latex mattresses. We’ll also review the essential background about latex beds to help you be a smart and savvy mattress shopper.

What Are the Best Latex Mattresses?

As the number of latex mattresses available has expanded, it has become easier for customers to become overwhelmed when trying to choose between them. Sorting through all the details and reviews can be a tedious process, so we’ve done the hard work for you and outlined our top 5 choices — which are not in a ranked order — in the table below.

ManufacturerModelLatex TypeFirmnessPrice (Queen)
AwaraLatex HybridMedium Firm (6)$1,199
BirchTalalayMedium Firm (6.5)$1,499
PlushBeds Botanical BlissDunlop2 Choices: Medium (5-6), Firm (7-8)$2,699
Latex for Less7″: Dunlop only, 9″: Dunlop & TalalayTwo-Sided: Medium (5), Firm (7.5)$1,449
Bloom HybridTalalayMedium Firm (6.5)$1,799
ZenhavenTalalayReversible: Luxury Plush (4-5) / Gentle Firm (7-8)$1,899

Awara

Why we like it:

  • Extra-breathable and cozy natural wool in the comfort system
  • Talalay latex provides softness and bounce
  • Wool, cotton, and latex meet high standards for eco-conscious production
  • 1% of sales donated to an environmental cause

Beds made with organic latex are a sustainable option for eco-conscious shoppers, and many of these mattresses also offer exceptional durability. The Awara is an excellent example. Constructed with a 4-inch comfort layer of organic Dunlop latex, the hybrid mattress provides long-lasting support without sagging or sinkage along the edges.

The pocketed coils are also zoned to provide varying levels of support to different areas of the sleeper’s body, resulting in fewer aches and pains. The Awara has a medium-firm (6) feel, making it ideal for back and stomach sleepers who weigh between 130 and 230 pounds, as well as heavier side sleepers. A breathable cover made from organic cotton and natural wool helps keep the surface cool, while steady airflow through the coil layer ensures consistent temperature neutrality.

The Awara’s price-point is very reasonable compared to other latex hybrids and the company offers free shipping to all 50 states. Additionally, the mattress is backed by a 365-night sleep trial and a lifetime warranty, both of which are longer than average.

Birch

Why we like it:

  • Made from certified-organic latex
  • Breathable cover and good temperature neutrality
  • Reasonably priced
  • 365-night trial and lifetime warranty

The Birch mattress, a new offering from Helix, is a hybrid that employs Talalay latex in its comfort layer to create an ideal sleep surface for a restful night.

The comfort system in the Birch mattress is made up of two materials. The topmost is a layer of New Zealand wool that is produced according to the eco-conscious standards of the PGC Wrightson Wool Integrity Program. Underneath the wool is a layer of Talalay latex that is certified by the Rainforest Alliance for sustainable production.

The latex layer provides a moderate level of conforming for pressure relief, and the wool contributes additional softness and comfort. Moving on the mattress is easy with the significant bounce of the latex. A Medium Firm feel of around 6.5 on the firmness scale makes the Birch a good fit for most sleepers regardless of sleeping position.

The support core is a thick layer of individually-wrapped innerspring coils. This layer provides additional bounce as well as responsiveness to the weight of the body. A thin bottom layer of wool helps stabilize the mattress and reduce any noise from the movement of the coils.

This mattress stays cool thanks to the breathability of the organic cotton cover, the naturally-moisture wicking wool, latex’s resistance to heat buildup, and the air that moves easily through the innerspring coils.

The Birch mattress comes with a 100-night sleep trial with a 30-day break-in period, and a 25-year limited warranty covers any mattress defects. As an added bonus for eco-friendly customers, Birch donates 1% of all sales to the National Forest Foundation, an organization working to plant 50 million trees in U.S. National Forests by 2030.

PlushBeds Botanical Bliss

Why we like it:

  • All organic and sustainable materials
  • Stable, supportive layers of Dunlop latex
  • Multiple choices for mattress height and firmness level
  • Notable conforming for relieving pressure points

The PlushBeds Botanical Bliss mattress sets a high bar when it comes to sustainable production and eco-conscious materials. All of the materials — cotton, wool, and latex — are certified organic according to the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) or Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS). The mattress boasts a huge range of other certifications including USDA Organic, Greenguard Gold, eco-Institute Certified, and more.

But it’s not just the environmental aspect that make the Botanic Bliss a top pick for the best latex mattress. The design of the mattress itself is excellent, offering customers a high level of performance in all of the six available models. PlushBeds offers this mattress in a 9”, 10”, and 12” model, each of which can be Medium (5-6 on the firmness scale) or Firm (7-8).

All of these mattresses utilize multiple layers of Dunlop latex produced at the ARPICO organic rubber plantation in Sri Lanka. This latex has mild contouring and above-average bounce, giving it a perfect mix of resilience and responsiveness.

The number of layers and their thickness varies depending on the height selected. In each case, the layers, which have different firmness feels, can be rearranged within the mattress to modify the overall firmness feel. A cover of organic cotton and wool surrounds the interior latex layers.

The Botanical Bliss has a higher price tag than many other latex mattresses being sold today, but this reflects the company’s unwavering commitment to sourcing truly organic materials. A 100-night sleep trial allows you to return the mattress for a full refund — after a 30-night break-in period — if you are not satisfied.

Latex for Less

Why we like it:

  • Flippable design with two firmness options in every mattress
  • Natural, single-origin latex layers
  • Two options for mattress height
  • Extended 120-night sleep trial

Latex for Less offers an affordable, well-designed latex mattress that is flippable and features a different firmness on each side. One side is Medium Firm (5 on the firmness scale) while the other side is Firm (7.5). This mattress employs the pressure-relieving properties of latex that customers in virtually any sleeping position can appreciate.

Customers can choose from a 7” or 9” height mattress height. There are minor differences in the construction of these two models. The 7” model has a 6” support core of Dunlop latex with half an inch of wool on either side. The 9” model has the same 6” layer of Dunlop latex but adds a 2” layer of Talalay latex, and again, these are nestled between thin layers of wool.

Adding the Talalay latex gives the 9” model a slightly bouncier and lighter feel on one side than the 7”, but both models provide the reversible firmness option. Both also have an organic cotton cover that works with the wool to assure breathability and excellent temperature regulation.

The latex in these mattresses is all-natural and made according to exacting standards. It contributes significant bounce that makes it easy to move on the bed, but at the same time, it cushions pressure points and keeps motion transfer to a minimum.

Bloom by Brooklyn Bedding

Why we like it:

  • Flippable design with two firmness options in every mattress
  • Natural, single-origin latex layers
  • Two options for mattress height
  • Extended 120-night sleep trial

The Bloom latex hybrid from Brooklyn Bedding is a top pick due in part to its wide firmness selection. Customers can choose from soft (3.5), medium (5.5), or firm (7.5) settings. Most sleepers should find a setting that feels comfortable and supportive regardless of their body weight or preferred sleep position. All versions of the Bloom contain a thick pocketed coil support core reinforced with high-density foam for excellent surface and edge support.

The comfort layer is constructed from Talalay latex, which usually provides closer conforming than Dunlop latex. A cover made of organic cotton and natural Joma wool ensures a cool, comfortable surface. These materials also wick away moisture from the sleeper’s body for added temperature regulation. Compared to other hybrids, the Bloom isolates motion transfer very well and does not make much noise. These characteristics make the bed suitable for couples.

The Bloom is fairly affordable for a latex hybrid. Brooklyn Bedding also offers free shipping anywhere in the contiguous U.S., as well as affordable rates for customers in Alaska and Hawaii. The mattress comes with a 120-night sleep trial and a 10-year warranty.

Zenhaven by Saatva

Why we like it:

  • Reversible design with different firmness levels on each side
  • High level of support and pressure relief
  • Top-quality Talalay latex
  • Free white-glove delivery and old mattress removal

The Zenhaven mattress easily makes our list of the best latex mattresses available online. It is an all-latex mattress made with thick layers of Talalay latex and attention-to-detail in the manufacturing process.

What makes this mattress unique, though, is its reversible design. On each side of a 6” thick latex support core (composed of two separate 3” layers) are comfort layers with different firmness feels. Each of these comfort layers is 1.5” thick. On one side, the feel is Luxury Plush (4-5 on the typical firmness scale), and the other side has a Gentle Firm feel (7-8). To change the comfort level of your mattress, all you have to do is flip the mattress over.

In addition to offering adjustable firmness, the Zenhaven scores well when it comes to support. The latex has enough responsiveness to contour to the body and relieve pressure points. At the same time, especially with the use of Talalay latex throughout, the Zenhaven has plenty of bounce to facilitate easy movement on the mattress and to prevent you from feeling stuck in the bed.

The Zenhaven is made by Saatva, which has a great reputation as a company. They offer free white-glove delivery that includes setup of the Zenhaven and haul-away of your old mattress. Though it costs nearly $2,000 for a Queen mattress, the Zenhaven’s strong track record of customer satisfaction demonstrates that its innovative design and quality materials are worth the investment.

Best Latex Mattress Buying Guide

What Are the Types of Latex Mattresses?

The term latex mattress is used broadly to describe a whole category of mattresses. Not surprisingly, then, not all latex beds have the same materials or construction. This section introduces the most important differences among the types of latex mattresses.

All-Latex and Latex Hybrids

Some latex mattresses have an internal construction that is entirely latex. These may be called all-latex or true-latex mattresses. In these mattresses, the latex is usually arranged in layers, and those layers may utilize different types of latex or latex with varying properties of firmness. Even an all-latex mattress isn’t 100% latex, though, as other materials, like cotton or wool, are frequently used in the cover.

A latex hybrid features latex as a central part of the mattress, but it isn’t the only material used. In most cases, a thick latex layer forms the comfort system that goes on top of a support core of innerspring coils.

Of course, other types of mattresses can use latex, but that doesn’t mean they are latex mattresses. For example, a memory foam bed might have a thin latex layer nestled in among the foams. Because the latex is not the central element in that mattress, it would not be considered either an all-latex or latex hybrid mattress.

What Are the Types of Latex?

Within the category of latex mattresses, some types can be distinguished based on the type of latex that is used. Latex mattresses may contain natural latex, synthetic latex, or blended latex, which is a mix of the two.

Natural Latex

Also called NR latex or pure latex, this material is derived from the sap of rubber trees. Trees produce this sap naturally, and removing the sap for latex does not harm the tree. Once the sap is removed, it can be processed into different types of latex rubber products.

Even natural latex is not 100% composed of sap. The conversion of sap into usable products requires adding a very small amount of additives to permit proper curing of the rubber. These additives are generally regarded as safe and are used only in small quantities, composing less than 5% of the final product. This means that 95% or more of the latex rubber is directly from the tree sap.

Organic Latex

All organic latex is natural latex, meaning that it is derived from the sap of trees. But not all natural latex is organic. The organic label goes beyond just being made from sap; it indicates that the way that the trees are cared for and that the rubber is made reflect principles of organic production.

For example, organic standards frequently require that no pesticides be used, that systems be in place for managing waste streams, and that systems are in place for transparency and verification of the production processes. Some organic standards also require provisions for protecting the rights and well-being of workers.

An organic certification indicates that the latex has been made according to the standards required by that specific certifying agency. As a result, not all certifications are created equal. One certification for latex that is well-regarded is the Control Union’s Global Organic Latex Standard (GOLS). GOLS includes criteria for sustainability in the cultivation and processing of sap as well as for the proper treatment of workers in this production process.

Dunlop and Talalay Latex

Natural latex for a mattress can be formed in two ways: the Dunlop process and the Talalay process. For this reason, you will frequently see latex in mattresses labeled as either “Dunlop” or “Talalay.” Both processes can make a high-quality natural latex product, but there are some notable differences in the characteristics of these materials. In the Dunlop process, manufacturers whip the sap into a froth, pour it into a mold, and then steam-bake it so that it holds its shape. During this process, some natural sediment accumulates at the bottom of the mold, resulting in a slightly denser, heavier mattress, especially on one side. Dunlop latex is often firmer and is well-regarded for its durability.
In the Talalay process, the sap is still whipped and put in a mold, but then the mold is vacuum-sealed and frozen. This stabilizes the components of the mold and prevents sediment collection. After being frozen, the mold is baked to finalize the process. Talalay latex has a more homogenous feel that tends to be lighter and slightly softer.

While the difference between Dunlop and Talalay latex is important to be aware of, remember that both processes use naturally derived sap that gives the material its fundamental properties. As a result, you’ll find moderate contouring and considerable elasticity in both types of natural latex.

Synthetic Latex

Synthetic latex, also known as Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) or SBR latex, is derived from petroleum-based chemicals. It has been chemically engineered to have a feel that is similar to natural latex, but its production does not require the harvesting of sap.

Historically, synthetic latex has been a cheaper product because of this ability to produce it without managing farms of sap-producing trees. However, because it is made with petrochemicals, its price can fluctuate significantly based on the global price of oil.

While synthetic latex is common in many types of consumer products, it is less frequently employed in mattresses. For bedding, there is a strong customer preference for natural latex, and as a result, most of the most popular latex brands are made without any synthetic latex. Very low-cost latex mattresses may use synthetic latex, but these tend to offer worse performance and durability relative to natural latex beds.

Blended Latex

As the name implies, blended latex is made with a mixture of natural latex and synthetic latex. The ratio of natural to synthetic can vary depending on the formulation needed for any specific product.

Understanding Latex Labels

To review, here’s a breakdown of what you might see on a latex label and what it means.

Type of latexPercentage of natural latexMattress components
Natural latex (all-latex, pure latex)95% or more natural latexNatural latex foam from rubber trees with small amount of additives for curing
Organic latex95% or more natural latexNatural latex that has been certified to meet standards of organic production, including in small percentage of additives
Blended latex (latex hybrid)VariesMostly synthetic latex mixed with some natural latex; exact ratio may or may not be listed
Synthetic latex (SBR latex)0% natural latexAll synthetic latex foams

What Are the Components of a Latex Bed?

Like most mattresses, a latex bed is composed of multiple layers, and those layers allow us to determine its type. Each layer serves as part of a specific element in the mattress construction.

The Support Core

The support core is the thickest part of a mattress. It provides a base level of stability and the bulk of the height of a mattress. Because it makes up a sizable percentage of the total mattress, it also plays a role in the performance of the mattress with regard to support and bounce.

In an all-latex mattress, the support core is made with one or more thick latex layers. Because of its density, Dunlop latex is used more frequently for a support core, but Talalay latex can function extremely well in this role as well. A latex support core is sturdy and durable, helping all-latex mattresses hold up well to nightly use over the long term. At the same time, the latex offers enough responsiveness to keep the mattress from feeling overly rigid.

The Comfort System

The comfort system is placed above the support core and is the part of the mattress designed to be most immediately felt by the sleeper. The contouring, bounce, and firmness of a mattress are directly influenced by the comfort system. In some beds, the comfort system is just one layer; in others, it is made up of multiple layers working together.

In both all-latex mattresses and latex hybrids, the comfort layer prominently features this material. Both Dunlop and Talalay latex can offer impressive performance in the comfort system with Talalay offering a slightly softer and bouncier feel in general.

Latex comfort layers provide multiple features that customers love. They have enough conforming to cushion pressure points, but their resilience means that there’s little risk of feeling stuck in the mattress. The bounce makes it easy to change sleeping positions or to engage in intimate activity on the bed. At the same time, the bounce isn’t so extensive as to cause problems with motion isolation. Latex does not retain significant heat, plus many latex comfort layers are aerated with small holes to let cooling airflow pass through.

The Transition Layer

Not all beds have a transition layer. Some mattresses, though, especially latex hybrids, may have a layer that sits between the support core and comfort system. Usually, this layer is denser than the comfort system but not as dense as the support core. It may be used to give a bit of extra cushioning and to make sure that sleepers don’t “bottom out” through the comfort system and put excess pressure on the support core.

The Cover

The last component of a latex mattress is the cover. A cover goes around the mattress, although it may be made of a different material on the top than on the sides and bottom. Cotton and polyester are both frequently used in mattress covers. Wool, which is soft and breathable, is often quilted with cotton to create a thicker cover with more cushioning built into it.

What Does It Feel Like to Sleep on a Latex Mattress?

Latex beds offer a unique feel that has made them a favorite among many sleepers. Thanks to their rubber content, they’re naturally elastic, so they’re excellent at accommodating pressure points while keeping a bouncy feel. The stability and moderate conforming make latex excellent at providing relief to people who struggle with back or hip pain.

In many ways, latex mattresses offer a perfect middle ground between innerspring and memory foam beds. They contour to the sleeper’s body like a memory foam mattress but without making them feel trapped or stuck. In addition, like an innerspring, they resist overheating and are bouncy enough to facilitate sex.

ILD and Density

Of course, not every latex mattress has the same feel. The latex can be produced and layered in order to provide a softer or firmer sleeping surface.

A term that you may come across that can affect the feel of a latex mattress is ILD, which stands for Indentation Load Deflection. ILD measures how much force must be applied to a material to cause it to compress a specific amount. ILD in latex materials usually ranges from 15 to 45, and the higher the ILD rating, the firmer the latex.

Keep in mind, though, that the ILD number alone doesn’t tell the whole story. ILD is affected by how thick the latex is, and it doesn’t communicate anything about the material’s responsiveness. In addition, the feel of a mattress is created by all of its layers, so looking at the ILD of just one layer can be misleading about the performance of the mattress as a whole.

Another term that is sometimes used to describe latex mattresses is density. In latex mattresses, this density usually ranges from 60 to 95 kilograms per cubic meter (kg/m3). Sometimes it is represented by the letter D followed by a number, like D75. A denser latex will usually be firmer and may be more durable as well.

What Are the Pros and Cons of Latex Mattresses?

Latex beds offer many advantages, but, like anything, they also come with their downsides. Review the list of pros and cons below to determine whether a latex mattress is right for you based on your sleep needs.

How Long Does a Mattress Last

How do you know if you need a new mattress? If you’re waking up tired and sore, it may be time to replace. Find out how long pillow top, memory foam, hybird, latex and more can last.

How Long Should a Mattress Last?

The average mattress lasts around 7-10 years depending on the type. Read on to learn the lifespan of each kind of mattress type.

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Innerspring Mattress
These typically have a lifespan of8 years. A continuous coil mattress tends to last longer, as its single coil is less likely to break.

Memory Foam
Memory foam mattresses contain an extra layer of foam for added comfort. With proper care, they can last for10-15 yearsdepending on the density of the foam.

Gel Memory Foam
This type of mattress helps to dissipate the heat throughout the bed and keep the mattress cooler at night. It also has a lifespan of10-15 years.

Latex
A natural latex mattress lastsup to 15 yearsdue to its elasticity. If the top layer wears out, you can replace it rather than purchase a new mattress. Latex mattresses are also the only mattresses that are naturally resistant to dust mites, making them particularly good for people with allergies or asthma.

Hybrid
The lifespan of a hybrid mattress depends on its material. Typically, a hybrid mattress combines inner coils with foam and has a lifespan of8-10 years.

Waterbed
Waterbeds are made with a vinyl covering that can puncture or tear. With proper care, a waterbed can last between8-10 years.

Pillow Top
The soft top of a pillow top mattress shortens its longevity. With proper care and rotating, it can often last about7 years.

Some mattresses, like memory foams and latex, can last up to 15 years, much longer than the average innerspring. In the end, it’s up to you how long your mattress lasts. If you’re still getting a good night’s sleep, you might not need to make a change.

How to Extend the Life of Your Mattress

Mattresses can last longer than expected depending on their use and care. Here are some preventative measures to extend the life of your mattress.

    Use a secure base
    Without the right support, your mattress will sag prematurely. Use a proper foundation, such as a box spring, wooden slats, or a metal base.

But consider to purchasing a new base if yours:

    No longer retains its shape

Has dents or sagging areas

  • Squeaks when you move around on the bed
  • Get a Mattress Protector
    Dust, sweat, body oils, and lotion seep into the mattress and wear down its fibers.

    Clean Your Mattress
    Ideally, your mattress should be cleaned twice a year. Sprinkle it with baking soda and vacuum after 30 minutes.

    Wash Your Sheets
    Wash your sheets weekly to eliminate dust, body oils, and debris that collect. This will prevent the debris from leaking into the mattress.

    Rotate Your Mattress
    Overuse of the area that supports your body will cause your mattress to feel less comfortable. Rotating it every 3 months can eliminate wear and tear in one area.

    Don’t Jump on the Bed
    This can cause wear and tear. For certain types of mattresses, you also risk damaging the springs.

    Don’t Sleep with Your Pets
    Your pet’s oils, dander, and urine can leak onto the mattress.

  • Prevent Bed Bugs
    Always check your luggage and clothing for bed bugs when traveling. Getting bed bugs may require buying a new mattress altogether.
  • How to Know if You Need a New Mattress

    Here are some telltale signs that your mattress may be past its prime:

      You wake up feeling older than your age- One of the biggest signs that it’s time to replace your mattress is when you consistently get a poor night’s sleep. Pay attention to how often you feel worse upon waking than you do when going to bed.

    You feel like the coils poke you in your sleep- This could be a sign of advanced wear and tear, depending on the type of mattress. It means you don’t have proper support and will likely affect your sleep quality.

    Your bed has become noisy- You’ll want to make sure that the mattress’ base is secure and still supports the mattress. You may have to replace both at once, or just one at a time, depending on the level of wear and tear.

    You just can’t get comfortable- Though an old mattress isn’t always the culprit of sleep discomfort, it should be one of the first things you check.

    Sleeping aggravates your allergies/asthma- Some dust mites live in every mattress and pillow, but they can accumulate over years of time. In addition to dust mites, common allergens, including mold, can grow in your mattress.

  • Your mattress has dents or saggy areas- Depending on the mattress type, this can mean that the coils are damaged.
  • Overall, if you’re consistently waking up feeling unrested, it’s probably time to start shopping. You’ll likely be able to save some money by looking online instead of in mattress stores. Check out our mattress reviews, such as our review of Saatva mattress, to learn more.

    Bottom Line

    Finding a mattress that lasts long can be tough. Once you find the right one, prolong its lifespan by taking care of it properly.

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    How Long Do Mattresses Last? The Results May Shock You!

    Mattresses are pretty expensive — one quick glance at our buyer’s guide will confirm this fact. This is why many people do not replace them – not even after many years of use.

    They do not want to spend a lot of money on a new one. Besides, now you can delay the process of buying a new one if you do an excellent job at maintaining your existing one.So, how often should you replace your mattress?

    It doesn’t matter which type of bed you have. Most of them are ready for replacement within ten years to ensure a good night’s rest (old mattresses can hurt your sleep quality). Besides, it can last beyond ten years on average, if the owners maintain it properly.

    Also, many different factors affect a bed’s lifespan. You can extend its life expectancy by following a few easy steps in the text below. We prepared and wrote down some tips to boost its longevity.

    How Long Do Mattresses Last?

    Mattresses aren’t exactly cheap, most people replace them very infrequently and consider buying a new one either a chore or a burden. It’s easy to delay or prolong this process simply by taking proper care of whichever type you own. As a general rule, most should be replaced within ten years for best results in sleep and health, however, the average life of a mattress can last beyond ten years or more if taken care of properly. While it is true that how long one lasts depends on different factors, you can easily increase its life expectancy by undertaking a small number of simple steps. Here is a look at a few of the factors that can decide how long should a mattress last, and possible ways to increase its lifespan:

    Table of Contents

    1. The Type

    What type do you have? For instance, is it air, innerspring, memory foam or latex? Each one has its own life expectancy; air and innerspring being the shortest, memory foam being mid length, while latex types are known to last the longest.

    • Air mattresses will over time either develop leaks or generally become less effective at retaining air pressure. If they have a built-in pump that becomes faulty, this too can lead to premature replacement. Overall, the average air mattress life expectancy is placed at five years.
    • Spring mattresses are good for sharing couples who like a springy and bouncy surface, but unfortunately, due to the inner core being thin metal wire, this type does tend to sag and lose its support even if flipped and rotated regularly. Even ones which have been well cared for will most likely need replacing within 7-8 years.
    • Memory foam mattresses are less prone to sagging but not invincible. They too require rotating, and foam does eventually lose its support but after a long while. This type should be good for at least ten years if kept ventilated, clean, and rotated.
    • Latex mattresses are the creme de la creme and tick all the boxes for quality and longevity. The naturally hypoallergenic and anti-microbial properties add to the durable nature of latex rubber foam to combine a core which can last up to 15 years.

    2. Regular Cleaning

    Another important factor which determines mattress life expectancy is to do with cleaning.Howdo you clean it? Do you clean itregularly? Do you give it to aprofessionalcleaner? It’s essential that you clean your mattress regularly to prolong the life. If you do not, it won’t last long at all. This is due to the invisible bacteria, mildew, and mattress mold that can slowly eat away at the materials involved. Moreover, it may be better if you could have it cleaned professionally from time to time, as mattresses are home to bacteria and germs in plenty, which might not get adequately cleansed with household cleaning products and methods.

    3. Amount of Use

    As you can imagine, anything that is used more will last less. However, there are two things that need to be kept in mind. Whichever type you own, it wouldn’t last as long in cases of extreme use, for example sharing couples who use for 10+ hours per day, and secondly on the other hand, if it has been left unused and uncleaned for prolong periods of time. Mattresses that are moderately used, where people sleep on it for around 7-8 hours a day, and then cleaned regularly are the ones that have the longest life.

    4. The Cleaning Products

    The question of how long do mattresses last really is to do with many supporting factors, but quite often depends on the cleaning methods used to clean them. For instance, in case of blood stains, you might have to use hydrogen peroxide to get rid. Too much of this chemical (and other heavy duty stain removers) would lead to a reduction of mattress life as these are not made to withstand such chemical uses.

    5. Proper Precautions

    It is always nice to have kids around the house. However, if your kids want to use your bed as a trampoline, it seriously isn’t a good idea. You would rather have them play elsewhere since this can seriously damage your bed. Imagine you have an innerspring, the springs will become too soft and compressed in no time at all and will leave you with a creaky and sagging surface. Additionally, whether it’s latex or memory foam, soon there will be indentations which are beyond repair. To prolong its life, you can also rotate and flip it from time to time, but that’s only if it’s double-sided and permits you to do so. You could perform this every few months for the duration of its life, which will significantly improve how long a mattress can last.

    When Do You Know You Cannot Use Your Mattress?

    Usually, mattresses that are over seven years old do not provide the comfort and support you need on the bed. Once you see there are signs of the surface and support wearing out, or you’re feeling uncomfortable in the bed when you are sleeping on it, you would be better off changing it. Some of the common visible signs of wearing are sagging, holes and tearing. If you cannot get a full night’s sleep and feel that you’re having a better slumber elsewhere than your bed, you need to start looking for a replacement.

    You might buy the most expensive mattress, but if you do not care for it properly, it might not even last ten years. On the other side, ones which are taken care of correctly are known to last more than 15 years.

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