How Long Should A Good Pillow Top Mattress Last

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7 Signs You Should Replace Your Mattress

A good night’s rest is crucial to your health and well-being, yet millions of Americans suffer from lack of sleep. TheSleep in Americastudy by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) found that 75% of adults have problems sleeping well. The study showed that 60% of respondents experienced daytime sleepiness that interfered with activities, caused work absences, or mistakes on the job. While medical conditions may be responsible for some instances of bad sleep, it might be your mattress that’s the issue. Review these seven signs that it’s time to replace your mattress to see if your bed is to blame for inadequate sleep.

#1 Your mattress is 7-10 years old

Research has found that mattresses have a life-span of roughly eight years, but this varies by manufacturer, mattress type, whether you sleep alone or with a partner, and how you sleep. If you’re a larger person, your mattress will likely wear out faster than manufacturer guidelines suggest.

Mattresses were not designed to last forever, and excessive wear and tear will age a product faster. Inferior products don’t last as long, yet even the highest-quality mattress has a maximum lifespan and will eventually need replacing. If your mattress is old, that’s the first sign you may need a new one.

#2 The mattress is saggy

If there’s a dent in your mattress in the shape of your body, that’s a signal that your mattress is overly worn. Sagging can occur with almost any mattress material (aside from waterbeds) and can be observed under your sleep area, at the edges, or both. If your mattress has springs, they can break down and sag.

Fiber, foam, and pillowtop materials all break down over time and the deeper the sag in your mattress, the more discomfort you’ll likely experience. Saggy mattresses can disrupt sleep and cause aches and pains. If your memory foam mattress core has softened, you may feel the sag as a “hammock” effect.

#3 Your spine isn’t aligned when you sleep

No matter how old (or new) your mattress, if it doesn’t offer proper support and alignment, you won’t get optimal sleep. For back or stomach sleepers, your spine’s natural S curve should be evident when you’re lying on your mattress. If it’s flattened or exaggerated, the mattress isn’t aligning your spine properly.

For side sleepers, your spine should be straight from neck to bottom if you’ve got proper support. A yardstick or level can confirm adequate alignment. A good pillow may correct minor issues, but if you can slide a hand in the gap between body and mattress, it’s a red flag that you might need a different mattress.

#4 Your mattress is uncomfortable

Knowing whether your mattress is comfortable sounds like common sense, but many people adjust to discomfort. If you get better sleep on a hotel mattress or a friend’s guest room, your home bed might not be comfortable enough. A bed may seem comfortable in a showroom but then doesn’t perform well at home.

The upper part of your mattress consists of “comfort layers” that should support your body and provide pressure relief. Comfort layers break down over time resulting in poor sleep and body aches but in some cases, your mattress choice might have been faulty from the start, and you need to replace it.

#5 You wake stiff and sore

Poor sleep can contribute to chronic back pain. If you wake up stiff and sore every day, your mattress could be part of the problem. If your back pain is worse when you wake but subsides when you stretch and move around, that’s a sign that the mattress is causing or contributing to your pain.

A firm mattress may not be the answer. A study from the Kovacs Foundation in Mallorca found that medium-firm mattresses provided better comfort for chronic low-back pain. Experts recommend sleep testing different types of mattresses before buying if you suffer pain while sleeping or when waking.

#6 Worsening allergies or asthma

If it’s not allergy season and there’s no alternate explanation for an uptick in allergy or asthma symptoms, your mattress might be the culprit.Slateinterviewed an expert on dust mites that said your mattress is a “crime scene in terms of how it gets inoculated with [dust] mites” over time.

The protein in dust mite feces may cause allergic reactions and asthma attacks and so can the dust that accumulates in your mattress. Vacuuming, steaming, and flipping your mattress might reduce dust and mites to ease your symptoms. If these steps don’t help, a new mattress might be the solution.

#7 You gained or lost weight (or added a co-sleeper)

For those that experience a significant gain or loss in weight over the life cycle of your mattress, the change might alter the effectiveness of your mattress. A Canadian study linked both inadequate and excessive sleep to weight gain so how you sleep and what you weigh are intermingled.

Heavier body types trigger more wear and tear on springs, foam, cushioning and mattress components. Also, if you were a solo sleeper but now have a partner in your bed, your mattress might not offer adequate sleep surface or support for the extra weight. That means it’s time for a new mattress.

Become an informed consumer

If you suspect you need a new mattress, do your homework, and educate yourself before you buy. Understand the lingo and gimmicks employed by mattress firms so that you get the product you need that fits your budget and gives you the best night’s sleep. There’s no prescription for which mattress will best fit your unique needs.

Look for a mattress that offers adequate support for spinal alignment. Comfort is subjective – it’s how a bed feels to you. You might find a firmer mattress superior to a softer one or vice-versa. Mattress selection is highly personal and should be your preference at the cross-section of proper alignment, support, and comfort.

How Long Do Mattresses Last? The Results May Shock You!

Mattresses are pretty expensive — one quick glance at our buyer’s guide will confirm this fact. This is why many people do not replace them – not even after many years of use.

They do not want to spend a lot of money on a new one. Besides, now you can delay the process of buying a new one if you do an excellent job at maintaining your existing one.So, how often should you replace your mattress?

It doesn’t matter which type of bed you have. Most of them are ready for replacement within ten years to ensure a good night’s rest (old mattresses can hurt your sleep quality). Besides, it can last beyond ten years on average, if the owners maintain it properly.

Also, many different factors affect a bed’s lifespan. You can extend its life expectancy by following a few easy steps in the text below. We prepared and wrote down some tips to boost its longevity.

How Long Does a Mattress Last

How do you know if you need a new mattress? If you’re waking up tired and sore, it may be time to replace. Find out how long pillow top, memory foam, hybird, latex and more can last.

How Long Should a Mattress Last?

The average mattress lasts around 7-10 years depending on the type. Read on to learn the lifespan of each kind of mattress type.

© CreditDonkey

Innerspring Mattress
These typically have a lifespan of8 years. A continuous coil mattress tends to last longer, as its single coil is less likely to break.

Memory Foam
Memory foam mattresses contain an extra layer of foam for added comfort. With proper care, they can last for10-15 yearsdepending on the density of the foam.

Gel Memory Foam
This type of mattress helps to dissipate the heat throughout the bed and keep the mattress cooler at night. It also has a lifespan of10-15 years.

Latex
A natural latex mattress lastsup to 15 yearsdue to its elasticity. If the top layer wears out, you can replace it rather than purchase a new mattress. Latex mattresses are also the only mattresses that are naturally resistant to dust mites, making them particularly good for people with allergies or asthma.

Hybrid
The lifespan of a hybrid mattress depends on its material. Typically, a hybrid mattress combines inner coils with foam and has a lifespan of8-10 years.

Waterbed
Waterbeds are made with a vinyl covering that can puncture or tear. With proper care, a waterbed can last between8-10 years.

Pillow Top
The soft top of a pillow top mattress shortens its longevity. With proper care and rotating, it can often last about7 years.

Some mattresses, like memory foams and latex, can last up to 15 years, much longer than the average innerspring. In the end, it’s up to you how long your mattress lasts. If you’re still getting a good night’s sleep, you might not need to make a change.

How to Extend the Life of Your Mattress

Mattresses can last longer than expected depending on their use and care. Here are some preventative measures to extend the life of your mattress.

    Use a secure base
    Without the right support, your mattress will sag prematurely. Use a proper foundation, such as a box spring, wooden slats, or a metal base.

But consider to purchasing a new base if yours:

    No longer retains its shape

Has dents or sagging areas

  • Squeaks when you move around on the bed
  • Get a Mattress Protector
    Dust, sweat, body oils, and lotion seep into the mattress and wear down its fibers.

    Clean Your Mattress
    Ideally, your mattress should be cleaned twice a year. Sprinkle it with baking soda and vacuum after 30 minutes.

    Wash Your Sheets
    Wash your sheets weekly to eliminate dust, body oils, and debris that collect. This will prevent the debris from leaking into the mattress.

    Rotate Your Mattress
    Overuse of the area that supports your body will cause your mattress to feel less comfortable. Rotating it every 3 months can eliminate wear and tear in one area.

    Don’t Jump on the Bed
    This can cause wear and tear. For certain types of mattresses, you also risk damaging the springs.

    Don’t Sleep with Your Pets
    Your pet’s oils, dander, and urine can leak onto the mattress.

  • Prevent Bed Bugs
    Always check your luggage and clothing for bed bugs when traveling. Getting bed bugs may require buying a new mattress altogether.
  • How to Know if You Need a New Mattress

    Here are some telltale signs that your mattress may be past its prime:

      You wake up feeling older than your age- One of the biggest signs that it’s time to replace your mattress is when you consistently get a poor night’s sleep. Pay attention to how often you feel worse upon waking than you do when going to bed.

    You feel like the coils poke you in your sleep- This could be a sign of advanced wear and tear, depending on the type of mattress. It means you don’t have proper support and will likely affect your sleep quality.

    Your bed has become noisy- You’ll want to make sure that the mattress’ base is secure and still supports the mattress. You may have to replace both at once, or just one at a time, depending on the level of wear and tear.

    You just can’t get comfortable- Though an old mattress isn’t always the culprit of sleep discomfort, it should be one of the first things you check.

    Sleeping aggravates your allergies/asthma- Some dust mites live in every mattress and pillow, but they can accumulate over years of time. In addition to dust mites, common allergens, including mold, can grow in your mattress.

  • Your mattress has dents or saggy areas- Depending on the mattress type, this can mean that the coils are damaged.
  • Overall, if you’re consistently waking up feeling unrested, it’s probably time to start shopping. You’ll likely be able to save some money by looking online instead of in mattress stores. Check out our mattress reviews, such as our review of Saatva mattress, to learn more.

    Bottom Line

    Finding a mattress that lasts long can be tough. Once you find the right one, prolong its lifespan by taking care of it properly.

    Note: This website is made possible through financial relationships with some of the products and services mentioned on this site. We may receive compensation if you shop through links in our content. You do not have to use our links, but you help support CreditDonkey if you do.

    How Long Do Mattresses Last?

    Mattresses aren’t exactly cheap, most people replace them very infrequently and consider buying a new one either a chore or a burden. It’s easy to delay or prolong this process simply by taking proper care of whichever type you own. As a general rule, most should be replaced within ten years for best results in sleep and health, however, the average life of a mattress can last beyond ten years or more if taken care of properly. While it is true that how long one lasts depends on different factors, you can easily increase its life expectancy by undertaking a small number of simple steps. Here is a look at a few of the factors that can decide how long should a mattress last, and possible ways to increase its lifespan:

    Table of Contents

    1. The Type

    What type do you have? For instance, is it air, innerspring, memory foam or latex? Each one has its own life expectancy; air and innerspring being the shortest, memory foam being mid length, while latex types are known to last the longest.

    • Air mattresses will over time either develop leaks or generally become less effective at retaining air pressure. If they have a built-in pump that becomes faulty, this too can lead to premature replacement. Overall, the average air mattress life expectancy is placed at five years.
    • Spring mattresses are good for sharing couples who like a springy and bouncy surface, but unfortunately, due to the inner core being thin metal wire, this type does tend to sag and lose its support even if flipped and rotated regularly. Even ones which have been well cared for will most likely need replacing within 7-8 years.
    • Memory foam mattresses are less prone to sagging but not invincible. They too require rotating, and foam does eventually lose its support but after a long while. This type should be good for at least ten years if kept ventilated, clean, and rotated.
    • Latex mattresses are the creme de la creme and tick all the boxes for quality and longevity. The naturally hypoallergenic and anti-microbial properties add to the durable nature of latex rubber foam to combine a core which can last up to 15 years.

    2. Regular Cleaning

    Another important factor which determines mattress life expectancy is to do with cleaning.Howdo you clean it? Do you clean itregularly? Do you give it to aprofessionalcleaner? It’s essential that you clean your mattress regularly to prolong the life. If you do not, it won’t last long at all. This is due to the invisible bacteria, mildew, and mattress mold that can slowly eat away at the materials involved. Moreover, it may be better if you could have it cleaned professionally from time to time, as mattresses are home to bacteria and germs in plenty, which might not get adequately cleansed with household cleaning products and methods.

    3. Amount of Use

    As you can imagine, anything that is used more will last less. However, there are two things that need to be kept in mind. Whichever type you own, it wouldn’t last as long in cases of extreme use, for example sharing couples who use for 10+ hours per day, and secondly on the other hand, if it has been left unused and uncleaned for prolong periods of time. Mattresses that are moderately used, where people sleep on it for around 7-8 hours a day, and then cleaned regularly are the ones that have the longest life.

    4. The Cleaning Products

    The question of how long do mattresses last really is to do with many supporting factors, but quite often depends on the cleaning methods used to clean them. For instance, in case of blood stains, you might have to use hydrogen peroxide to get rid. Too much of this chemical (and other heavy duty stain removers) would lead to a reduction of mattress life as these are not made to withstand such chemical uses.

    5. Proper Precautions

    It is always nice to have kids around the house. However, if your kids want to use your bed as a trampoline, it seriously isn’t a good idea. You would rather have them play elsewhere since this can seriously damage your bed. Imagine you have an innerspring, the springs will become too soft and compressed in no time at all and will leave you with a creaky and sagging surface. Additionally, whether it’s latex or memory foam, soon there will be indentations which are beyond repair. To prolong its life, you can also rotate and flip it from time to time, but that’s only if it’s double-sided and permits you to do so. You could perform this every few months for the duration of its life, which will significantly improve how long a mattress can last.

    When Do You Know You Cannot Use Your Mattress?

    Usually, mattresses that are over seven years old do not provide the comfort and support you need on the bed. Once you see there are signs of the surface and support wearing out, or you’re feeling uncomfortable in the bed when you are sleeping on it, you would be better off changing it. Some of the common visible signs of wearing are sagging, holes and tearing. If you cannot get a full night’s sleep and feel that you’re having a better slumber elsewhere than your bed, you need to start looking for a replacement.

    You might buy the most expensive mattress, but if you do not care for it properly, it might not even last ten years. On the other side, ones which are taken care of correctly are known to last more than 15 years.

    The Truth About Pillow Top Mattresses

    Review, Ratings, Comparisons and Complaints Based on 1,874 Owner Experiences

    What You Need To Know

    THE GOOD.Pillow top mattresses have above-average initial comfort. Tops that include memory foam tend to have above average (back) pain-relief potential and conforming ability.

    THE BAD.Pillow top mattresses overall are at least two times more likely than non-pillow top mattresses to have problems with durability, off gassing, and heat retention.

    WHAT IS A PILLOW TOP MATTRESS.Pillow tops are most often found on innerspring beds and perhaps airbeds. A pillow top (or euro top) mattress is generally defined as a mattress with several inches of additional padding sewn into the top. This padding can consist of regular foam, memory foam, latex, fiberfill, cotton, wool. Some tops have an integrated appearance with the mattress (euro top) while others appear to be merely lying on top. A non-pillow top mattress, by contrast, often has only minimal to moderate padding.

    Pillow Top vs Non-Pillow Top Mattresses

    The following table compares pillow top and non-pillow top mattresses based on actual consumer experiences. The findings apply mostly to innerspring mattresses.

    Pillow TOPnon- pillow top
    Longevity / durabilitydcLearn more.
    Easy to maintaindc+Pillow top mattresses likely require at least twice the maintenance in regard to (head to foot) rotation.
    Pricec-B-Pillow top beds are on average about 30% more expensive than non-pillow top beds.
    General supportCB-Sagging of pillow tops can undermine support and possibly cause back pain as a result.
    Edge supportD+C+Support can be lacking for sleeping or sitting near the edge of pillow top mattresses, especially those with thicker tops. Eurotops (tops that are tapered near the edges) tend to perform better.
    Conforming abilityBD+Pillow tops are more likely to contour to the body and relieve pressure points.
    No initial odorc-b-Learn more.
    No sleeping hotc-b-Learn more.
    Easy to move on / get up offD+BSoft pillow tops with at least two inches of memory foam provide some resistance to movement / changing positions.
    Motion isolationBCPillow top beds often have sophisticated spring systems that keep movement isolated so as to not disturb one’s partner. The top itself may also absorb some motion.
    Back sleep friendlyBb-The conforming ability of most pillow tops can be beneficial to back sleepers.
    Side sleep friendlyA-CSide sleepers tend to be most satisfied with pillow tops as they often provide softness for hips and shoulders.
    Front sleep friendlyC-B+Thicker and softer pillow tops may allow stomach sleepers to sink too far into the mattress thereby undermining neck alignment and or breathing ease.
    Firmness optionsB-CPillow tops are mainly available in medium or soft, and non-pillow tops mainly in medium or firm.
    Short break inC-B-Pillow tops with memory foam especially can require extended time for break in.
    Heavy person friendlyCBPeople over 230 pounds may find that they sink too far into thick pillow tops.
    Good for sexbb-Pillow tops often provide good comfort but may lack the bounce of non-pillow tops. See mattress sex comparison for general analysis.
    Easy to lift, move, handlec-c+Pillow top mattresses with their extra material tend to be heavier by about 20% on average.

    Analysis of Key Issues

    INITIAL COMFORT

    Owner experience data suggests that a pillow top mattress is initially effective at minimizing pressure points, relieving pain and fostering better sleep. But these benefits often do not continue beyond the first few years – or even the first few months in some cases.

    PILLOW TOP DURABILITY

    At least 30% of pillow top mattress owners report significant sagging or compression occurring within three years of ownership. By contrast, about 17% ofnon-pillow top mattress owners report the problem. Sagging, of course, often undermines comfort and support.

    A person’s weight and size donotappear to be the main factor in regard to whether a pillow top will sag / compress as owners weighing under 150 pounds regularly report the problem.

    PILLOW TOP LIFESPAN

    The chart below shows the lifespan of pillow tops as a group based on owner experiences. In other words, it shows how long a pillow top maintains all or most of its initial comfort before it sags or compresses.

    SLEEPING HOT

    Pillow top mattresses, especially those with memory foam, are at leasttwo timesmore likely to sleep hot thannon-pillow top beds.

    About 8% of pillow top mattress owners report that their bed acts as a heat trap resulting in an uncomfortably warm sleep surface.

    By contrast, about 4% ofnon-pillow top mattress owners report a sleeping hot issue. (Learn more about mattress heat retention.)

    INITIAL ODOR / OFF GASSING

    Initial odor or off gassing refers to smell or gas that a mattress can give off when it is new due to the manufacturing and or packaging process.

    The intensity of the odor can vary from mattress to mattress, and the odor can last from a few hours to a few months.

    Non-pillow top mattresses have few complaints regarding off gassing odor. By contrast, about 8% of pillow top bed owners, especially owners of beds with memory foam tops, complain about odor. Learn more about mattress off gassing.

    PAIN RELIEF

    Especially when they are new, pillow tops tend to be effective in the relief of pain – including back, hip and shoulder pain – as at least 20% of owners report pain-relief benefits. As the top ages, compresses and sags, at least some pain benefits disappear.

    In addition, pillow tops with memory foam tend to be more effective in the relief of pain than pillow tops without memory foam. Learn more about mattress pain relief.

    PILLOW TOPS: AIRBEDS VS INNERSPRING BEDS

    Airbeds and innerspring beds are the mattress types most likely to have a pillow top.

    Airbeds
    Any part of an airbed can be replaced, including the pillow top. The top is not permanently attached to the airbed, and, as a result, the existing top can be easily removed and a new top added. The cost of the replacement top may or may not be covered under the warranty. In addition, the pillow top of an airbed can often be easily rotated or flipped to extend its life.

    Innerspring Beds
    In contrast to an airbed, a pillow top on an innerspring mattress is almost always permanently attached and cannot be easily replaced or replaced at all. This likely means that, unlike the case with airbeds, the entire mattress would need to be replaced (or repaired by a professional) if the pillow top lost its comfort. The cost of replacing / repairing the mattress may or may not be covered under the warranty terms.

    A small number of innerspring mattresses have a pillow top on the front and the back of the bed. This allows the mattress to be flipped on occasion to increase the lifespan of the pillow top and therefore the lifespan of the entire bed.

    Sleep Like The Dead’s mattress research in The News –

    About Our Mattress Research

    Our pillow top mattress research findings are based on 1,850+ mattress consumer reviews that were collected using our unbiased, accurate methodology.

    Remember

    – While pillow top mattresses tend to have good-to-excellentinitialcomfort, their long-term comfort is generally no better than fair due to compression and sagging.

    – Pillow top mattresses overall are about twice as likely to have a problem with initial odor / off gassing than non-pillow top beds. This is usually because pillow top beds include more foam material.

    – Pillow top beds, especially softer models and those with memory foam, are at least two times more likely to sleep hot than non-pillow top beds. About 8% of pillow top mattress owners report unwanted heat retention.

    – Pillow tops are mainly available in medium or soft, and non-pillow tops mainly in medium or firm.

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