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How to Dispose of Mattresses

Some places can collect mattresses, but others require you to deliver them.

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As soon as your new mattress arrives, your old one becomes a heavy, bulky nuisance. Still, you shouldn’t just drop it in an alley or leave it by the dumpster — your regular garbage collection service might not pick up large items routinely, and dumping old mattresses on the street is illegal in some areas. Although you can have mattresses hauled to a landfill, recycling or reusing them is more eco-friendly and less wasteful. Never resell, donate or abandon a mattress that is infested with bedbugs or other pests; these must be disposed of by professionals.

Inspect the mattress for bedbugs by looking in the creases around the seams for black or red spots. Also look for stains, sagging areas and popped springs. You need to know what condition your mattress is in before you decide what to do with it.

Call local thrift stores, charity shops and shelters if your mattress is in reasonably good condition and free of bugs. Ask if they can accept a mattress as a donation, and if so, what their requirements are for the item’s condition. If someone wants your mattress, have them pick it up and haul it away, or deliver it to them if they don’t offer this service.

Place ads on sites like Craigslist.org and Recycler.com and in your local newspaper to sell your used mattress if it is in good condition and free of bugs. The better the mattress’s condition is, the more money you can probably ask for it; you can also set a higher price if you are able to deliver the mattress instead of having the buyer haul it away.

Take the mattress to a mattress recycling facility if there is one near you. These facilities break mattresses down to their component materials and keep as many as possible out of landfills. Many of these facilities require that you bring them the mattress rather than collecting it from you, and they usually charge a small fee. Visit the International Sleep Product Association’s website to check for recycling facilities in your area. If the mattress has an insect infestation, ask the recycling center what you need to do to the item before you deliver it.

Ask the retailer selling you your new mattress whether he can haul away the old mattress. Most retailers provide this service, but there’s no way to tell what they do with the item afterward, so this is the least reliable way to make sure your old mattress isn’t resold or reused inappropriately.

Contact your regular trash collector if you can’t find any other way to dispose of the mattress. Ask what you need to do to have your mattress taken to a landfill. If the item has bugs, ask if you need to do anything in particular to address this. Follow their instructions to have the mattress removed.

Mattress Disposal Guide

The Mattress Recycling Council estimates that Americans dispose of roughly 15 to 20 million mattresses every year. The average mattress takes up 40 cubic feet, which means that one year’s worth of discarded mattresses will occupy more than 132,000 square miles of landfill space. To cut down on waste and preserve landfill space, mattress owners in the U.S. are encouraged to get rid of their old mattresses using alternative means. This guide will feature some helpful tips for donating, recycling, reselling and reusing old or used mattresses.

Junk Removal

If you do not live close to any thrift stores, recycling centers and other facilities that accept used mattresses, then a junk removal service may be your best bet. These options include national companies that serve households across the country. Local junk removal specialists are widely available, as well. Due to the recent emphasis on landfill conservation and green disposal methods, these companies will often attempt to recycle or donate used mattresses before sending them to the dump.

Let’s discuss the step-by-step process for hiring a company to remove your mattress

  1. Check your warranty before getting rid of an old mattress, as the seller or manufacturer of the mattress may offer complimentary buy-back and/or disposal services.
  2. Calculate the weight of the mattress. Some junk removal companies charge by volume, while others will assess a flat per-item fee.
  3. Research national and local junk removal services available in your area, and perform a cost comparison for all viable options. Note that some companies charge an additional fee for home-based pickups, on top of the per-item removal costs.

This should yield a thorough, ordered list of junk removal services. Some of the companies that offer nationwide pickups include:

  • Load Up:This company will remove any/all household goods and operates nationwide. They offer very competitive pricing, operate in all 50 states, and have terrific customer service making them a solid choice if junk removal is your best bet. They will remove mattresses with bed bugs if customers give advance notice
  • 1-800-GOT-JUNK: This company will remove any old household goods and furnishings, including mattresses. Simply call the number (800) 468-5865 and set up a time for a uniformed truck team to visit your residence. In most cases, appointments are made with a two-hour window. 1-800-GOT-JUNK offers upfront, all-inclusive pricing based on the overall volume of all removed items. The company will accept mattresses with bed bugs if the customer gives advanced notice.

Mattress Recycling

Roughly 80% to 90% of mattress parts (by weight) can be recycled or repurposed to create new products. To properly recycle an old or used mattress, first locate the nearest recycling center that accepts them. A quick Internet search using your zip code will most likely yield at least one location within reasonable driving distance. Both ByeByeMattress.com and Earth911 offer online aggregators that allow you to search for recycling centers accepting certain household goods (such as mattresses) in your geographic area.

In most cases, you will be charged a fee for recycling your old mattress. Expect to pay $20 to $40 per mattress if you arrange for pick-up services at your home, or $10 to $20 for each mattress you transport to a recycling center in your own vehicle. The criteria for acceptable mattress donations will vary by organization. Most centers will not allow you to donate a mattress that is wet, stained or infested with bed bugs. However, broken or torn mattresses can usually be donated.

State laws and regulations may apply. In California, Connecticut and Rhode Island, for instance, mattress stewardship laws require retailers to include an additional fee for all customers who are purchasing a new mattress. Money from these fees are used to:

  • Purchase containers and materials used at collection sites
  • Transport mattresses to collection sites
  • Facilitate recycling and collection events
  • Provide incentive payments to designated recycling center personnel

To learn more, please visit the ‘Programs by State‘ section found on ByeByeMattress.com.

Recyclable components of mattresses include the springs, foam, upholstery, wooden parts and the box spring. For more information on other uses for different mattress parts, check out the section below on breaking down and reusing mattresses.

Mattress Donations

The average mattress has a lifespan of seven to eight years. Unless an old mattress is in complete disrepair, then you may be able to donate it to an organization that accepts used household goods. Some national charities that may receive old or used mattresses and mattress parts include:

  • The Salvation Army:This international organization has been serving families in need since the 1860s, and today maintains thrift stores and charity shops across the United States. The Salvation Army offers free furniture pickup services for mattress donations in certain locations; goods may also be dropped off in person at any location that receives used goods. Mattresses must be in good shape and free of tears, burns, and other types of damage. Donations to the Salvation Army are tax-deductible; single mattresses are valued between $15 and $35, while double mattresses are valued between $12.50 and $75.Please note that the Salvation Army may refuse to accept mattresses in certain states or municipalities.
  • Free furniture pickup services
  • Salvation Army’s tax deduction value guide
  • Habitat for Humanity International:HFHI is an international nonprofit organization that strives to provide sustainable and affordable living accommodations for people in need. The organization accepts a wide range of gently used household good and furnishings, including mattresses. HFHI sells donated goods at ‘ReStore’ home improvement centers located across the country; to donate a mattress to HFHI, contact the nearest ReStore facility and let them know you have a mattress to donate. You may drop off the mattress in person; many ReStore locations offer free furniture pickup, as well.Habitat for Humanity may not accept mattress donations in some locations.
  • Donate goods to Habitat ReStore
  • Furniture Bank Association of America:The FBA’s mission is to provide home furnishings “at little or no cost” to individuals and families living in poverty. The association operates nearly 80 donation centers in North America. Households are welcome to donate old mattresses to the FBA, although pickup services are limited to a 15-20 mile radius of the nearest bank’s brick-and-mortar location; contact the nearest bank to see if pickup services are available. The association will make exceptions for large commercial or institutional donations; banks will usually drive up to three hours for these furniture pickups, and some banks have large semi-trailers capable of traveling up to 450 miles for large donations.
  • List of U.S. furniture banks
  • Goodwill:This American charity organization provides job training and employment placement services for people who face certain barriers in the job market. Goodwill also operates more than 3,200 thrift stores and donation centers across the country; in 2015, roughy 85% of revenue generated from donated goods was used to expand the organization’s professional development and community outreach programs.At this time, Goodwill does not accept used mattresses or box springs; however, you are welcome to donate mattress pads, bed frames, bedding and linens.
  • Goodwill donor guidelines

Additionally, you will often be able to donate an old or used mattress to a local charity organization. The website DonationTown.org allows visitors to search for local organizations that accept used mattresses and other household furnishings. These may include:

  • Homeless shelters
  • Women’s and family shelters
  • Locally owned thrift stores

Break it Down and Reuse it

Next, let’s look at some ways you can break down an old or used mattress and reuse certain components for different purposes.

  • The average mattress contains 25 pounds ofsteel, most of which is found in the springs. Steel can be melted down to create a wide range of parts and products. Simply remove all springs and other steel parts from your mattress, then bundle them together and sell them for scrap. You can locate scrapyards and metal recyclers in your area with a quick Internet search. Rates will vary by location, but expect to earn roughly $10 for 100 pounds of scrap metal.
  • Thepolyurethane foamin mattresses can be shredded and repurposed around the house for carpeting, car seat cushions, pillows, pet bedding and other types of padding.Memory foamandlatex foamcan be reused in a similar fashion.
  • Most mattresses include a mix ofnatural fiberslike cotton, wool and silk, andnon-natural fiberslike polyester and rayon. Most natural and non-natural fibers found in a mattress can be recycled. Like foam, mattress fibers can also be reused to make padding or insulation.
  • Thewooden partsof mattresses can serve several functions once the mattress has been taken apart. In addition to firewood, this wood can be shredded and used as a gardening or lawn mulch.
  • Nails, screws and other small metal partsin reasonable condition can be removed from the mattress and reused for various household projects.
  • Buttons,braidingand other decorative features can be repurposed for DIY sewing projects and other household designs.

When disassembling a mattress, please exercise caution: innersprings contain many sharp parts that can cause bodily injury. For a detailed step-by-step guide for taking apart a mattress, check out this eight-minute video posted by YouTube user Canadian Treasure Hunter.

Clever solutions

Finally, let’s look at some fun, creative ways to repurpose your old or used mattress.

  • Mattress springs can be used for a wide range of arts and crafts. These include decorative candle and plant holders, wall sconces, photo frames and backyard trellises.
  • If you enjoy decorating for the holidays, mattress springs can also be used to create metal wreath displays and tree ornaments.
  • An old memory foam mattress can be used to form a comfy bed for your dog or cat.
  • Other uses for old memory foam padding include plush household items like bean bags, chair cushions, pillows, dishwashing sponges and stuffed animal filler.
  • Green Diary suggests using old mattress components to improve your backyard compost pile. Simply construct a sturdy compost bin using the wooden slats, and then scatter mattress stuffing and fibers around the compost to protect it from pests.
  • The durable fabric upholstery of an old mattress is ideal for making throwaway rugs for your foyer, garage, shed or utility room.
  • The DIY design website Pinterest features more than 1,000 postings about projects involving old mattresses.
  • Use your old mattress as the canvas for a painting or other art project. YouTube user KIPTOE offers some inspiring ideas in a 2016 ‘Mattress Street Art’ video tutorial.

How to Tell When You Need a New Mattress

Most of us were taught to buy a new mattress every ten years or so. The truth is, the right time to replace your mattress depends on a variety of factors, and it may be more often than you think. If you can relate to any of the following, then it’s likely time to get a new mattress:

  • Body Aches:You or your partner find yourselves waking up feeling stiff, achy or numb.
  • Sleep Deprivation:Even after eight hours of sleep, you still feel tired.
  • Dust:Your mattress looks dusty, or you find yourself coughing or sneezing.
  • Sagging:You find yourself rolling to the center of your mattress.
  • Wear and Tear:Your mattress has rips, stains, lumps or worn edges.
  • Comparison:You’ve slept on a different mattress, or even a couch, and experienced better sleep than on your mattress.
  • Age:You’ve had your mattress longer than seven years, or you can’t remember how long you’ve had it.

How long a mattress will last also depends on what type it is. The average lifespan for each type of mattress is outlined below:

What about your warranty?

If your mattress is worn out, you’re probably wondering if the wear and tear is covered under your warranty. It’s important to understand what’s covered in your warranty before you purchase a mattress, but we’ll run through the most common features below.

A warranty is essentially a company’s promise to stand behind its product, and there are two main types:

Written: A written warranty is just what it sounds like. The company agrees, in writing, to replace a mattress if damage falls under certain listed conditions. These usually last five, ten, fifteen or twenty years and are not required by law.

Implied: Implied warranties are required by law and include:

  • Warranty of Merchantability:The product will be functional and include everything advertised.
  • Warranty of Fitness:The product can be used for everything the seller claims.

All warranties have different stipulations, but there are items that are commonly covered or not covered:

What is Covered:Typically, a mattress warranty cover product defects, not wear and tear from normal use. Problems that are usually included are:

  • Saggingbelow aspecified depth, often 1.5 inches
  • Coilsthat break, bend or come out of the side
  • Seamsthat come undone
  • Irregularbunching

What is Not Covered:Problems that arise from normal use or an owner’s accident are typically not covered and may include:

  • Saggingthat doesn’t reach thespecified depth
  • Lumpinessfrom long-term use
  • Discolorationfrom washing

Furthermore, there are actions that will usually void your warranty, including:

  • Removing the law tag
  • Stains
  • Improper support (box spring or bed frame)
  • Failure to rotate mattress
  • Mattress is given to someone else

One more point to keep in mind is the difference between prorated and non-prorated warranties:

  • Prorated: The owner isn’t expected to cover repair or replacement costs, other than maybe transportation
  • Non-prorated:The owner must cover a percentage of the repair or replacement costs.

Additional Tuck Resources

For more great resources related to purchasing and owning mattresses, check out the following Tuck guides:

How to dispose of a mattress

Knowing when to get rid of a mattress can be as difficult as knowing how. Our guide to disposing mattresses explains all you need to know.

Put us to the test

Our Test Labs compare features and prices on a range of products. Try Which? to unlock our reviews. You’ll instantly be able to compare our test scores, so you can make sure you don’t get stuck with a Don’t Buy.

Buying a new mattress will set you back anywhere between a few hundred and a few thousand pounds, so parting with even more cash to dispose of your old mattress is probably the last thing you want.

But finding a way to dispose of a mattress for free is no mean feat, especially if you want to get rid of it in a responsible way. According to a report by the National Bed Federation (NBF), 6.8 million replacement mattresses were sold in 2015, while only 879,000 were recycled. That’s a recycling rate of just 13%, which is down from 16% in 2014.

Far too many mattresses end up in landfill sites. Not only is this bad for the environment, but, given the bulky nature of mattresses, it’s also unsustainable. Many of the mattresses in landfill could have been recycled or reused. Keep reading for expert advice on how long a mattress should last and how to get rid of it once it’s passed its best.

In the market for a new bed? Take a look at ourBest Buy mattresses.

In this article:

How often should you change your mattress?

If you can’t remember how many years you’ve had your mattress, the chances are it’s time for a new one. It’s all too easy to lose track of how long you’ve been sleeping on it and, even if it still feels comfortable, it’s likely to be less supportive and less hygienic than when it was new.

The Sleep Council recommends replacing your mattress as often as every seven years, because after that time the mattress will have been subjected to more than 20,000 hours of use. That’s the equivalent of 2,555 nights – which is a lot when you consider that adults lose an average of half a pint of fluid each night and shed a pound of dead skin cells each year.

But our own durability tests reveal that the best mattresses can last up to a decade without softening, sagging or becoming less supportive. So, provided you buy a good mattress and clean it regularly, you may only have to change it every 10 years.

Find out how long different type of mattress should last below, or go to our guide on how to clean a mattress.

How long should a mattress last?

Nearly half of Which? members expect a new mattress to last more than a decade, according to a November 2017 survey of 902 members. We reckon that’s pretty optimistic, not least because there are some common misconceptions about the lifespan of a mattress.

Only one in five Which? members think a mattress will last longer if it’s bought as part of a set with a new bed base. Although buying a new bed frame is no guarantee your new mattress will last, using an old or incorrect bed frame with your new mattress certainly isn’t going to lengthen its lifespan and it may well also invalidate your warranty. Take a look at our top 10 bed shopping tips.

Some 46% of members also thought that the more you spend on a mattress the longer it is likely to last. While investing in an expensive mattress will likely mean you get better-quality fabrics and fillings, it is no guarantee of a longer lifespan. We’ve tested £200 Best Buy mattresses that perform better in our durability tests than mattresses costing more than 10 times as much.

Finally, fewer than two in 10 members agreed that foam mattresses are more durable and longer lasting than spring mattresses.

How long does a pocket sprung mattress last?

A good pocket sprung mattress should comfortably last between 8 and 10 years. Of the 49 spring mattress we’ve tested, 59% of them earn more than four stars in our tough durability tests.

After measuring the height, firmness and supportiveness of every mattress we test, we then simulate up to a decade of use by rolling a heavy barrel over the mattress 30,000 times. To do well in our durability tests, a mattress must maintain its supportiveness, firmness and height.

Our pick of the top pocket-sprung mattresses will help you pick out a long-lasting option, but you have to do your bit, too. To maximise the life of your pocket-sprung mattress, it’s essential that you follow the manufacturer’s instructions when it comes to rotating or turning the mattress.

How long does a memory foam mattress last?

Memory foam mattresses tend to perform well in our durability tests. Of the 26 memory foam, foam and latex mattresses we’ve reviewed, 93% of them score more than four stars in our lifespan test.

However, we’ve also uncovered a memory foam mattress that failed our durability test completely, making it the only Don’t Buy mattress we’ve reviewed.

And just because you buy a memory foam mattress doesn’t mean that you don’t still need to rotate it regularly, so there’s no less maintenance than a pocket-sprung option.

All in all, we wouldn’t recommend buying a memory foam mattress solely for the durability, unless it provides the supportiveness and comfort you’re looking for as well.

How to get rid of a mattress

You may be surprised by how many different ways you can dispose of your mattress. There are at least 10 different options, but some of them are expensive, environmentally damaging and even illegal, so picking the best way to get rid of your mattress can be difficult.

Will the council collect my mattress?

Most, if not all, local councils offer a bulky waste collection and disposal service, which includes beds and mattresses. But it can be surprisingly expensive and there’s often no guarantee your mattress won’t end up in landfill – many local authorities simply say that they will recycle some or all of the waste where possible.

Some councils, such as Oxford City Council, Liverpool City Council and the London Borough of Merton, offer free mattress collection, but they’re very much in the minority. Most councils charge a fee to collect bulky waste and it can be expensive – the likes of Argyll and Bute Council and Wealden District Council charge more than £50 for the service, for example.

If you live in England or Wales, you can find out how much your council will charge for bulky waste disposal by typing your postcode into the gov.uk website. If you live in Scotland or Northern Ireland, go to your council’s website and search for bulky waste disposal.

Having the council collect your mattress from your home can be convenient, but make sure you read the terms and conditions carefully. Many councils charge for the number of bulky items they’ll be collecting, but bear in mind that a bed frame and a mattress will likely count as at least two items. And items will often only be collected if they’re left in a designated spot outside the house.

Will the local tip take a mattress?

The local tip will take your old mattress, but to get it there you’ll need a vehicle big enough to fit it in. If the boot of your car isn’t big enough to fit the mattress when flat, you may find that it fits if you roll the mattress up as best as possible and fasten it using some rope.

But that’s a lot of effort to go to when the mattress may well just end up in landfill anyway. You may decide you’d rather go to the extra effort of taking it to a dedicated recycling facility, or decide you’d rather pay for the convenience of the council or a specialist disposal company coming to collect it from your house.

Can you recycle a mattress?

At the very least, some parts of your mattress will be recyclable, and it’s possible that all of it will be. And yet, according to The Furniture Recycling Group, Wembley Stadium could be filled five times with the 7.5 million mattresses that are discarded in the UK every year.

While mattress recycling is relatively labour-intensive, more and more facilities capable of doing this work are springing up around the UK. These facilities will break down your mattress into its recyclable components – springs can then be melted down and remade into new metal products, while synthetic layers such as foam can either be used to make carpet underlay or else can be sent to a plant where the waste can at least be converted into energy.

Aside from taking your old mattress to your nearest recycling centre yourself, the best way to ensure your mattress is recycled is to pay for it to be collected. But whether you use the local council, the company delivering your new mattress or a specialist mattress removal company, make sure it is clearly stated that the mattress will be recycled. Otherwise, it’s probably best to assume that it won’t be.

Can you pay a company to pick up a mattress?

Four in ten Which? members disposed of their last mattress by having the company delivering their replacement mattress collect it, according to our November 2017 survey of 902 respondents.

That’s perhaps not surprising given the number of major high-street retailers now offering this service. Argos and Ikea, for example, both offer to collect and recycle your old mattress for a fee of £20 when you buy a new mattress from them. John Lewis offers a similar service, charging new mattress customers a fee of £29.95 to responsibly dispose of their old mattress.

Bed-in-a-box mattress brands such as Casper and Emma also offer an old mattress collection service for customers.

But getting the retailer to collect your old mattress when they deliver the new one is only convenient if you’re sure that the new mattress is the one for you. Otherwise you’ll be left without a bed at all if you later decide to return it. If you’re in any doubt, specialist mattress companies such as Collect Your Old Bed can pick up and dispose of your old mattress at a time of your choosing. But it’s always worth making sure the company actually recycles the mattress. We’d also recommend checking how much your local council charge before paying for one of these services, or else you risk paying over the odds.

See our list of thebest mattress retailersfor more information.

Can you donate a mattress?

If your mattress is still in good condition, you should consider donating it to charity or giving it away for free. That way you can help someone in need as well as ensuring that it doesn’t end up in landfill.

Organisations such as British Heart Foundation and British Red Cross will resell your mattress and put the proceeds towards a good cause. Other organisations, such as Furniture Donation Network, directly give your mattress to someone in need. Several other charities also accept mattress donations, so if there is a cause you particularly want to support, it’s worth contacting the charity directly.

As a general rule, these organisations will collect your mattress free of charge, but they may request you send images first to prove that it is of acceptable quality. Any organisation accepting a mattress donation will expect it to be fit for use, clean and have a fire label intact.

Another way to ensure your mattress stays out of landfill sites is to use a non-profit initiative such as Freecycle, which will put you in touch with someone in the local area looking for a free second-hand mattress.

Are there any other ways to dispose of a mattress?

There are several other ways to get rid of a mattress, but we wouldn’t recommend most of them.

Although 1% of Which? members told us they disposed of their last mattress by burning it, we don’t advise it. Not only is a mattress fire hard to control, but the fumes released by the fire could also be damaging to both you and the environment.

If you happen to be renting a skip and don’t mind your mattress contributing to a worsening landfill problem, then you can get rid of your old mattress using a skip.

But you should never dispose of your mattress by putting it in someone else’s skip or, worse yet, simply abandoning it on the side of the road. As well as both being anti-social and environmentally harmful, fly tipping is illegal and can result in a large fine.

Now that you know how to dispose of your old mattress, find out how to buy the best new mattress to replace it with.

How To Dispose Of A Mattress

Last Updated on April 8, 2020 by Lully Sleep

It is true that sleeping on anuncomfortable and saggymattress can disturb you throughout the night. It in turns leads to back pain thus, hindering your functionality. If you are not satisfied with the type of mattress you have,it important to investin a new one. You are probably thinking what you should then do with your current mattress.

There are a variety of ways you can dispose of your mattress legally,instead of burning or throwing it away. Disposing of a mattress differs from company to company, and for a majority of mattress stores, there is a requirement of purchasing a mattress before disposing of one. Below are the ethical methods of disposing of your mattress.

1. Give It to Your Retailer

A standard method is to consult your retailer. This is theideal method for those planningon investing in a more comfortable bed. Your desired manufacturer might take the old mattress for free. However, the mattress company may ask you to buy another one to compensate for the cost.

Sometimesmattress storesdo not charge you for this service, but there may be hidden charges under the price tag. Therefore, you should consider whether you would like to immediately purchase another mattress after disposing of the previous one.

2. Donate Your Mattress

Many charities or nonprofit organizations will accept your old mattress. Unless the condition of the mattress is unsanitary, then you can donate it to specific organizations that accept mattresses. For those of you who do not know which organizations would accept this donation, don’t worry, we’ll discuss that later in the article.

A prominent international organization is theSalvation Army. This organization aims to help needy families and are located across the United States. You can either drop your mattress off at one of their locations or call them for a free pickup service.

Another organization is Habitat for Humanity International, a nonprofit organization which accepts used household furniture including used mattresses. Like the Salvation Army, it alsooffers free servicesacross the country.

A third charity organization where you can dispose of your mattress is Furniture Bank Association. Theywelcome household’s itemssuch as old mattress that is still in excellent condition.

3. It’s Time to Sell It

Selling your old and lumpy mattress is the option most of you want to hear. Who doesn’t want tomake some moneyfrom their used things? Before you decide to sell it, make sure that your mattress is in excellent condition. This means cleaning it, because the cleaner and intact it is, the more likely it is that you are able to sell it.

There are different online websites where you can sell your mattress such as eBay and Craigslist for example. However, to get the best price for your mattress here are few tips to follow.

  • Wash and remove all stains from your mattress.
  • Upload high-quality imagesto these sites to attract customers.
  • Add specific details about the mattress and your desired prices.

4. Send It to Recycling Centers

Sending your mattress to the recycling centers might be inconvenient for the majority of you, since this requirestransporting your mattress, which can be a hassle. However, you can feel proud of yourself once you have completed this task and it’s always easier and a bit more fun when you have the help of a friend.

Once you arrive at the recycling center, one of their assistants will help you unload the mattress and recycle it.

5. Rent a Large Open-Top Waste Container

Many of you have neverrented an open-top waste container, also known as a skip or dumpster. However, these can be incredibly helpful when disposing of large objects, such as mattresses. Renting a large waste container is aneasy and convenient method.

Some rental waste container companies may charge you a little more for the mattress, but it varies based on the size of your mattress. To reduce the charges, you can cut up the mattress into smaller pieces.

6. Use a Local Authority Service

Whiledisposing of your mattress, do not forget that some local authority services offer the option to take large household items. Not every council gives you this service and those who do, may charge a fee. This method saves you from putting the extra effort into carrying your mattress to a different location.

Instead, the local authority service books a date and collects it within the time frame. After this, they will recycle it properly in order that it does not destroy the environment.

7. Recycle Your Mattress

Another reliable method of disposing, is recycling the mattress yourself to ensure a clean and better environment. For this purpose, there exist a few businesses that collect and professionally recycles mattresses. It has estimated that80% to 90%of the mattress can be reused.

Once you find a recycling center that accepts the mattress, you will be surprised to find that many of these companies do not ask for any money. For those who are not residing near a thrift or recycling center then ajunk removal optionis also acceptable. They will check the warranty and quality of the mattress and then pick up your mattress and recycle it.

8. Break It Down

Most of the time due to the quality and other reasons,many charity organizationsdo not accept mattresses. If this is the case, you have the option to break down the mattress for disposal. The below-mentioned steps are required toprepare your mattress of disposing.

  • Bring your mattress out to an open area such as a backyard.
  • Take a sharp knife and remove the outer covering of the mattress. Cut the box springs around the corners and extract the fabric.
  • Clean the fabric of the mattress.
  • Collect the fabric and place it in a

9. Offer It to Your Friend or Colleague

It should be mentioned that sharing is caring. Almost everyone has friends that believe in sharing. If there is no option left for disposing of a mattress, donate it to a friend. In some rare cases offering a used mattress may be taken offensively.

To avoidany hurt feelings, simply inform your friend you have an extra used mattress since you had recently bought a new one. With this method, there is a better chance that your friend will take your used mattress.

10. Do It Yourself Recycling

You can also recycle your mattress without using any charged services. There aresurprisingly many differentuses for an old mattress. However, recycling also depends upon the type of the mattress you have.

For breaking down the mattress, all you will need is a screwdriver, pliers, and sharp blade. Mattresses with inner springs can beeasily recycledwithout any mess. The coils can be scrap metal after the process of recycling.

11. Use a Free Collector Ad

If the choices mentioned above do not work for you, then a collector may be an option. Not everyone can sell a mattress effectively online. In this case, you can create an advertisement for it on a website. It will reach a greater audience of people who are looking for a free mattress and will help you in saving a bit of money.

12. Throw It in the Waste

If you do not have any luck in any of the above options, thendispose of the mattressin the waste. You can divide your foam into smaller pieces and store it for a couple of weeks. In this ways, you can throw smaller pieces away each day. Although this method takes longer than the other options, it is free of cost.

CONCLUSION

All in all, we can say that disposal of the mattress is not an arduous task if tackled correctly. Moreover, before youplan to disposeof a mattress do not forget to check for its quality and appearance, because nobody wants to buy a used product that is full of dirt and stains. Whether you prefer to spend money or not, the–will help you in disposing of a mattress.

How to dispose of an old mattress

A guide to mattress disposal and recycling across the UK

Buying a new mattress is a wonderful event. Especially when you realise that your old mattress was pretty past it, and your best nights’ sleep are ahead of you.

However, you’re left with a cuboid-shaped puzzle: mattress disposal. Wondering how to get rid of your old mattress brings many questions. Can you take a mattress to the tip, for example? Can you leave it on the street? Is it ok to have an unseasonal ‘bonfire night’ celebration? (The answers to two of these questions should be self-explanatory, but just in case, please don’t leave your mattress on the side of the road or set fire to it.)

Contrary to popular belief, old mattresses don’t end up starring in global productions of The Princess And The Pea. Mattress disposal can result in large, multi-material objects ending up in landfill. Waste isn’t good in any form, but mattresses are really large bits of waste, so it’s important to get this right.

That’s why we’ve researched the best ways to dispose of an old mattress, all of which are easy for you to follow, and good for the environment, too.

Mattress disposal: Everything you need to know

Are mattresses recyclable?

Yes! It’s possible to recycle 100% of the components of a mattress. Recycling plants can break them down to their component pieces and redistribute each to an industry that can use it.

Can I give my old mattress away?

If you believe your mattress is no longer good enough for yourself, then it’s unlikely to be good or healthy for anyone else to sleep on, either. As a guide, the National Sleep Council suggests changing your mattress every seven years.

This means that while handing a mattress down to your kids or donating it to a charity shop is a cost-effective way of dealing with its disposal, it’s not necessarily the best idea.

Can I take my mattress to the tip?

Yes. If all else fails you can take your old mattress to the skip to dispose of it personally, although doing this means it will end up in landfill, unless you find a good recycling plant.

However, simply dumping it might land you with a fee, so it’s worth reading on as we explore other, more environmentally-responsible ways to dispose of your mattress.

How can I get my mattress collected for free?

Ideal worlds don’t exist, which is why you shouldn’t be surprised to learn that finding someone who will collect your mattress for free is tricky.

However, it’s not impossible. Some charities, like the British Heart Foundation, will offer to collect your old mattress from you for free. The only catch here is that the mattress needs to be re-sellable. Which, considering you don’t want it any longer, might not be the case.

An alternative charity route is to arrange a collection from Emmaus. This charity tends to collect for free, but it’s worth checking its website. Your mattress will then be used in accommodation for people that Emmaus is trying to help avoid substance abuse or violence. So, the mattress will need to be clean and in good condition.

Can I pay a company to dispose of my mattress?

Most mattress retailers go beyond the notion of simply providing a mattress and offer to collect your old bed-pal upon delivery of its replacement. Here’s a quick run through of what the top mattress manufacturers/retailers currently offer in the way of collections and recycling.

Emma

Emma offers a mattress removal service for £55. Depending on the condition of the mattress, it will be donated to a partner charity (Debra, Shelter or The British Heart Foundation), recycled or sold on eBay as an ‘Emma Refurbished’ product. Simply click the ‘old mattress removal’ option when at checkout to arrange a collection date (note that this will need to be different to the delivery date).

Dreams

Just like Emma, Dreams offers a collection service for mattresses that are ready for pastures new. You’ll have to pre-wrap your mattress for collection, but the Dreams website goes into pleasing amounts of detail and guides you through the entire process. This service costs £25 for a single mattress, £35 for a double and £40 for a king or superking.

Spoiler alert: most retailers offer the same kind of service. Ikea is no exception, giving its customers the chance to pay for mattress recycling at checkout. It also happens to offer far and away the best value mattress collection option at just £20 (upon delivery of a new one). That’s a bargain!

Simba

Simba offers a removal service at the point of delivery for £40 (or £50 for an Express Service within two days) on the proviso that the mattress is in a reasonable condition.

An Otty spokesperson told us it costs £30 to take advantage of its mattress collection service, which isn’t too bad at all. Mattresses must be removed from the bed frame in order for the courier team to arrange collection and Otty states that mattresses are recycled within a couple of days.

John Lewis

John Lewis charges £24.95 for its mattress collection service. The retailer states that it will dispose of your old mattress ‘responsibly,’ and though this may be open to interpretation, you can’t deny the comparatively low cost of this service.

Mattress Online

When you purchase a mattress through Mattress Online, you’ll get the option to have your old one collected on delivery. Mattress Online is very proud of its recycling initiative in partnership with The Furniture Recycling Group which ensures that mattress components are separated and distributed to industries that can benefit from the raw materials. The service costs £24.99, making it one of the cheaper options on this list.

Argos

Competing with Ikea for the title of ‘Cheapest Mattress Removal Service,’ Argos will take your old mattress away for £20. You’ll need to purchase a new one in order to take advantage of this service, as is the case with every option on this list. Frustratingly though, Argos is a little vague about what it means by ‘recycling.’

Amazon

The internet shopping giant features here because it is rolling out a mattress recycling service in the US at the moment. It’s also the first of these retailers to offer the service without requiring you to purchase a new mattress, which makes it a seriously good option. Coming soon to a laptop near you.

Paying a waste company

If you really want to know where your mattress is going – and when – hire the services of a waste disposal company. Doing so requires little more than a web search with your location settings turned on to find your nearest mattress collection and disposal company.

More often than not, these companies claim that they recycle, and that they have great customer service and flexibility. So, you can get your mattress collected when you want and sent somewhere that you’re happy with, albeit for a fee.

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