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12 Best Mattresses You Can Buy in 2020

Say goodbye to back pain and hello to deep sleep.

Not to add more pressure, but buying a new mattress is one of the most important purchases you’ll make for your home. It needs to be comfortable and supportive to give you the best possible sleep, and durable so you won’t have to replace it within a few years. And because mattresses can get pricey, you want to make sure you’re investing in one that’sactuallyworth the cost.

The Good Housekeeping Institute Textiles Lab reviews mattresses of all kinds, from traditional innerspring mattress that you buy in stores to foam mattress-in-a-box styles that you buy online. On top of researching the brands, materials, and features, we have product experts and consumer testers try them out, and we survey our tester panel to get in-depth reviews from thousands of real users.Here are the best mattresses to buy in 2020:

Best Online Mattress:Saatva Mattress
Best Value Mattress: Allswell Luxe Hybrid Mattress
Best Firm Mattress: Stearns & Foster Cassatt Luxury Firm Mattress
Best Mattress-in-a-Box:Casper Mattress
Best In-Store Mattress-in-a-Box:tulo Mattress
Best Adjustable Mattress: Sleep Number 360 p6 Smart Bed
Best Organic Mattress: Avocado Green Mattress
Best Cooling Mattress:Tempur-Pedic Tempur Luxe Breeze Mattress
Best Reversible Mattress:Layla Mattress
Best Mattress on Amazon:T&N Original Mattress
Most Innovative Mattress Material:Purple Mattress
Most Versatile Mattress:Bedgear M3 Mattress

Below, you’ll find more on the top mattresses that offer something for every price point, feel preference, and personal sleep needs, but first, here’s what to consider as you shop foryourbest mattress:

Which mattress material is best?

Memory foam and innerspring mattresses are the two most common types of mattresses on the market, but it’s really a matter of personal preference. You can find mattresses at every firmness level and price for either material.

  • Memory foam mattressesadapt to your body shape so it feels like your pressure points are being cradled.
  • Innerspring mattressesare usually firmer and have more bounce.
  • Hybrid mattressesuse a combination of foam and innersprings so you don’t have to pick just one.

How do I pick the best mattress?

Consider your sleep position:stomach sleepersneed a firm mattress,side sleepersshould opt for a softer surface, andback sleepersfall somewhere in between. The goal is to keep your spine in neutral alignment, so there should be less stress on the pressure points like your shoulders, hips, and knees.

Read on for more details about the best mattresses (with prices listed for queen-size), plus feedback from consumer testers and the experts in our Textiles Lab. And while you’re shopping for a new mattress, check out our top-tested bedding picks for sheets, pillows, and comforters, along with mattress protectors to help extend the life of your new bed.

The Best (and Worst) Mattresses You Can Buy in a Box

Shopping for the best mattress online is a waking nightmare, and picking the wrong one can literally cause bad dreams or kill your back. It doesn’t help that the online market is flooded with options, or that there are more dedicated mattress review sites than stars in the sky. It’s a mess.

WIRED is not a dedicated sleep site, but we did fill a room with 25 of the top mattress-in-a-box models and spent several days unboxing, examining, reclining, and even jumping on each of them last year. Since then we’ve tested half a dozen more mattresses. Below are my favorite (and least favorite) mattresses right now. All of the prices are for queen-size models.

Be sure to check out our many other buying guides, including Best Sound Machines and our roundup of the best gifts for people who like to sleep.

Updated for April 2020: We’ve added the Birch Mattress to this guide and fixed pricing elsewhere.

Best Overall (I Fell Asleep)

I have tried outa lotof mattresses, but only one put me to sleep. Helix’s Midnight Luxe has a plush cushion top and a medium-firm feel that’s relaxing in side-, back-, or stomach-sleeping positions (and I’m most definitely a stomach sleeper). The lights were on and our testing room was loud, but I dozed off anyway.

Helix mattresses are hybrids and have a base of individually wrapped coils that are firmer in areas that need more support, like your lower spine. On top is a stratum of cooling gel foam and denser foams (more info here). It’s cozy, and Helix has a variety of other mattresses that cater to different sleeping positions and firmness preferences. It’s pretty impressive. The only downside is that the price is as "Luxe" as its comfort.

The Cheapest Good Mattress

The Allswell shocked me. It feels more expensive than it is. Unlike many similarly priced mattresses by companies like Amazon Basics and Zinus, the Allswell is a hybrid mattress (made by Walmart) with a full bed of individually wrapped springs inside it to prevent motion transfer, topped with a layer of gel-infused memory foam that keeps you cool and contours to your body. It has a medium-firm, supportive feel and is rimmed with tubing like a traditional mattress, giving it better edge support than many foam models.

The $645 Allswell Luxe (also at Walmart) is similar, with three added layers of foam and a plusher top cover.

Best for $1,000 or Less

Out of a bundle of new mattresses my wife and I have slept on in the past few months, this is the one we’re still using. Like the standard Allswell, the Supreme is a hybrid mattress and, as you may gather from its name, it’s the best the company has to offer.

I find it about as luxe and comfy as many $2,000 mattresses but it’s half the price. At its core is a bed of individually wrapped coils, topped with a base layer of firmer foam, a layer of copper- and graphite-infused gel foam to dissipate heat, and a plush top layer. If you’re pregnant or have a pregnant partner, I can say that this is the only mattress my wife wanted to sleep on during her third trimester, because of its softness and support in side-sleeping positions (we had five to choose from at the time).

If you care about the fine details, you’ll notice it looks cheaper than some super expensive mattresses and doesn’t have the best edge support. You can also feel the coils if you run your hands along the sides, which is totally fine, but not something you typically notice on a high-end mattress.

Choosing the best mattress type

Find the best mattress for your body and budget. We look at the pros and cons of different types – from memory foam mattresses to pocket sprung and latex.

Put us to the test

Our Test Labs compare features and prices on a range of products. Try Which? to unlock our reviews. You’ll instantly be able to compare our test scores, so you can make sure you don’t get stuck with a Don’t Buy.

Memory foam, pocket sprung, latex, open coil, continuous coil. not sure which type of mattress is best for you? We look at the pros and cons of the main types of mattresses to help you find the best.

There are four main mattress types to choose from. Most mattress manufacturers make more than one type – different varieties go through a different manufacturing process and cost different amounts. Price isn’t everything, though, as what is most important is what you as an individual find comfortable.

Read on to help you decide which type of mattress to buy. Once you’ve made up your mind, you can use the filters on our independent mattress reviews to find your perfect mattress.

Spring vs foam mattresses

Watch our video below to find out the key differences between the main mattress types, including what each one is made up of and how it will affect your sleep.

Use our interactive tool below for more information on the differences between spring and foam mattresses.

Keep reading for more information on the main type of mattress. Or, if you already know which type you want, find out how to buy the best mattress.

Pocket sprung mattresses

In pocket sprung mattresses, the springs are sewn into individual fabric pockets. Pocket sprung mattresses are the most popular type of mattress among Which? members – more than half of the members we surveyed about their mattress had bought a pocket sprung one.

Pocket sprung mattresses don’t mould to your shape in the same way that memory foam mattresses do, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they offer less support. They also tend not to be as warm as memory foam mattresses, which could be an important consideration if you tend to find yourself too warm at night.

We’ve tested some great pocket sprung mattresses at a range of different prices, so you’re sure to find one that suits you. Go to our Best Buy mattresses page to see the very best.

Memory foam mattresses

Memory foam mattresses, also known as memory mattresses, are topped with a layer of temperature-sensitive viscoelastic material (memory foam). They can be expensive, but we’ve found some fantastic memory foam mattresses for less than £400.

This makes the shape of the mattress change to fit the shape of your body, and it also tends to make the mattress feel warmer.

Everything you need to know about this increasingly popular type of mattress can be found in our memory foam mattresses guide.

If you already know that you want to buy a memory foam mattress, you can find the right model for your budget and body type by reading our mattress reviews.

Continuous coil and open coil spring mattresses

These mattresses are cheaper than other types of bed mattress.

  • Continuous coil mattresses are made from a single looped wire
  • Open coil mattresses are made of single springs fixed together by one wire.

Because the springs move as one unit, you’re more likely to be disturbed by your partner moving around during the night. The coils in these mattresses wear out more quickly than pocket springs, so you’re likely to end up rolling together eventually.

When we surveyed Which? members to find out more about mattresses, those who own an open-coil mattress are less likely to say that it helps them to get a good night’s sleep than those who own other types of mattress.

You can find out more about our survey results, including which brands to look out for, in our full mattress brand reviews.

Latex mattresses

Latex is a less common type of mattress which features a core made up of layers of springy latex. These mattresses tend to be more expensive, but manufacturers claim that they are more resilient and able to better keep their shape.

Manufacturer Dunlopillo specialises in latex beds, although the Dunlopillo mattresses we’ve reviewed don’t come cheap.

Mattress toppers

These are different from mattress protectors in that they add a layer of extra padding to your existing bed. Mattress toppers can be made of memory foam or other materials. However, they can be as expensive as buying a new mattress in some cases, and won’t provide more support if your old mattress is already sagging.

Discover which are the best mattress topper brands according to our survey of more than 1,000 mattress topper owners.

The Best Mattress in a Box for Every Sleeper (And Every Budget)

These days, to find the best mattress, you’re really looking for the best mattress in a box. Not only can you order them in a few clicks, you can also avoid all the problems that come with brick-and-mortar mattresses stores: high prices, scheduling deliveries, creepy sales people that keep asking increasingly invasive questions about how you sleep, etc.

There’s just one thing: you can’t try it out first! But trust us, after comparing more than 20 mattresses from the internet, we can assure you: the risk is worth the reward. And, to minimize the risk, we’ve put them to the test ourselves.

Over the past few years, we’ve actually built our own mattress emporiumexclusivelyfrom mattresses in a box. We sentGQstaffers, the sleep-indifferent and sleep-obsessed alike, to put the mattresses through the same tests they would if they were buying them at a store. Everyone’s favorite test? Testing the responsiveness and bounce by running across all 20 mattresses. In clean socks, of course.

Obviously, you can’t replace sleeping for months on a mattress with a series of catnaps. But by bringing all the mattresses in the same room, and bringing editors of all different sleeping types and mattress expertise levels, it became a lot easier to articulate differences in the small things, like, “Where is the line between feeling swaddled in memory foam and feeling like you’re drowning in it?” and “Does this mattress sleep hot, or is it just me?” Some people tested the edge support, while others focused on heat or only considered mattresses that had spring coils instead of pure memory foam.

Despite all the differences in preferences, some clear favorites emerged.The best mattresses in a box are comfortable and supportive. That’s it. Two factors. The materials, firmness, thickness, hyper-cooling gel-cushions, whatever—they all combine to offer some combination of comfort and support.

Comfort is easy to conceptualize. How comfortable does it feel to lay on this? How hot does it get? Do I like the cradling of the foam, or the bounce of a coil spring mattress—or a little bit of both, like in a “hybrid” mattress?

The support part is harder. Hammocks and bean bags arecomfortable, but let us know how supported your back feels after sleeping in them for a year. Generally, thicker mattresses and denser materials are more supportive. As they get more expensive, mattresses get thicker and heavier, with an increasing amount of layers aimed at providing comfort (the top part) while giving you a solid foundation to support your body as it lays on it 2,000 hours a year (the bottom part).

If you are an average-sized male adult, you already have some options eliminated for you: it is likely a medium-soft or soft mattress won’t provide enough support for your frame; you’ll sink into a medium or medium-firm mattress just like a child or someone closer to 100 pounds might sink into a soft or medium-soft mattress. Side sleepers, whose hips and shoulders dig into the bed and create uneven pressure, might lean toward medium options, though materials and mattress thickness also affect this, as memory foam mattresses can “sink” more and keep the spine aligned and pressure even while broad shoulders are digging into the mattress.

Withallthat in mind, we’ve created this guide to help take the guesswork out of buying the best mattress in a box online. To make sure we bring you the best and most up-to-date mattress reviews in 2020, we’ll keep testing new ones all year round. When combined with our favorite sheet sets, pillows, and comforters, these mattresses provide what we think is the best possible sleep experience you’ll ever get. Without further adieu, here are the best mattresses in a box for every price and every sleeping style.

The Best Mattress for a Better Night’s Sleep

Buying a new mattress? Here are tips for finding the right mattress for you.

You spend about a third of every day in bed. Whether that time is spent blissfully slumbering — or tossing and turning — depends a lot on your mattress.

"A mattress can impact a person’s sleep," says Michael Decker, PhD, RN, associate professor at Georgia State University and spokesman for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

One way that your mattress affects your sleep has to do with the network of fine blood vessels, called capillaries, that runs underneath your skin.

"When you lie on any part of your body for an extended period of time, the weight of it reduces the flow of blood through those blood vessels, which deprives the skin of oxygen and nutrients," Decker says. This causes nerve cells and pain sensors in your skin to send a message to your brain for you to roll over. Rolling over restores blood flow to the area, but it also briefly interrupts your sleep.

Ideally, a mattress that reduces the pressure points on your body should give you a better night’s sleep, Decker says. Yet the ideal mattress is different for each person.

Which Mattress Is Right for You?

Finding the right mattress isn’t about searching out the highest-tech brand or spending the most money. "A much more expensive mattress doesn’t necessarily mean it’s better," Decker says. A high price tag is a product of both the materials that go into the mattress, and the marketing that helps sell it.

Instead of focusing on price and brand name, think about what you want in a mattress. "Selecting a mattress is very personal," Decker says. Some people prefer a firmer mattress; others favor a softer style.

Although there isn’t a lot of scientific evidence to prove that one type of mattress will help you sleep better than another, people with certain medical conditions do seem to rest easier on a particular mattress style.

Anyone with back or neck pain should take a Goldilocks approach to mattress buying: not too hard, and not too soft.

"If you’re on too soft [of] a mattress, you’ll start to sink down to the bottom. But on too hard of a mattress you have too much pressure on the sacrum, and on the shoulders, and on the back of the head," says Howard Levy, MD, an Emory University assistant professor of orthopaedics, physical medicine, and rehabilitation.

Continued

A medium-firm mattress, or a firm mattress with a softer pillow top, will give your spine that "just-right" balance of support and cushioning.

An adjustable bed can be a good buy if you need to sleep with your head raised. Doctors sometimes recommend elevating the head to help people with COPD breathe easier, or to prevent nighttime heartburn from GERD. These beds can also allow you to adjust your knees and hips to a 90-degree angle, relieving some of the pressure on sore joints, Levy says.

If you have allergies or asthma, you might have considered buying a bed labeled "hypoallergenic."

"There are a lot of claims made by mattress manufacturers that their mattresses are hypoallergenic or don’t support the growth of dust mites, but I don’t know of scientific evidence to support these claims," says Paul V. Williams, MD, a pediatrics professor at the University of Washington School of Medicine and an allergist at Northwest Allergy and Asthma Center in Washington state. Williams says dust mites will live anywhere there’s food — and that food is your dead skin cells.

Instead of investing in an allergy-free mattress, slip on a washable mattress encasing. It will form a barrier that prevents dust mites from getting to you. A mattress encasing cuts allergen growth by robbing dust mites of their food supply, Williams says.

And what about those space-age memory foam mattresses, which can cost thousands of dollars? There is some evidence they can help with back problems and improve sleep, but their advantage over a regular coil mattress is only slight. Where memory foam mattresses can really help you sleep is if you have an active bed partner who is keeping you awake, Decker says. Foam mattresses reduce motion transfer, letting you lie still while your partner tosses and turns.

Test Drive a Mattress Before You Buy

"You wouldn’t buy a car without test driving it," Decker says. So why would you invest hundreds — or even thousands of dollars in a mattress without trying it out first? Take any new mattress you’re considering for a test nap. "People should not be embarrassed to go into a store and lay on a mattress for 20 minutes," Decker says.

Continued

For a more realistic test, sleep in the beds at different hotel chains when you travel. If you get an especially good night’s sleep on one of them, ask the desk clerk what brand it is.

When you test out a mattress, make sure it feels comfortable in every position, especially the side you favor for sleeping. The mattress should be supportive where you need it, without putting too much pressure on your body, Levy says.

Time for a New Mattress

If you’ve been having trouble sleeping, the problem might not be your mattress type, but its age. "It’s really important for people to realize that mattresses have a certain lifespan," Decker says.

Keep your mattress too long, and the foam and other materials inside it will start to break down, compromising its ability to support your body.

Decker recommends keeping your mattress for no more than 10 years. After that, it’s time to go mattress shopping again.

Sources

Michael Decker, PhD, RN, associate professor, Georgia State University; spokesman, American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

Howard Levy, MD, assistant professor of orthopaedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, Emory University.

Berghold, K.Spine, April 2008.

Paul V. Williams, MD, FAAAAI, clinical professor of pediatrics,University of Washington School of Medicine; allergist, Northwest Allergy and Asthma Center.

Kovacs, F.Lancet, November 2003.

Halken, S.Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, January 2003.

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